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^iid PubU4hed by the Future Farmers of America i Moi^ UtwAazd^LuJi A FLOURISHING COLLEGE Take away the water. Absence of the pure water of God's Word turns higher education, any education, into a curse. In the modern educational desert, Satan kicks the sand of error in the young eyes, blinding them to truth; parches their soul with the dry philosophies of human vanity; btvns them with the fire of sin; and deceives them with an elusive mirage promising a better world through education. In the midst of the desert is Bob Jones University— an oasis. Water is the chief attraction of an oasis. There is plenty of it at BJU, for we believe in the "old-time religion" and the absolute authority of the Bible. Furthermore, Satan has not been able to trample the grass, strip the foliage, or contaminate the water. BOB JONES University Music, speech, and art without additional cost above regular academic tuition. Graduate Schools of Religion and Fine Arts. Institute of Christian Service, high school, and elementary school in connection. WE PROVED TO FIVE DOUBTING FARMERS WHO WERE FARMING ON SOMEONE ELSE'S TIRES. FIRESTONE 23°TRAaOR TIRES LET YOU QUIT AS MUCH AS AN HOUR EARLIER OR WORK UP TO 6 MORE ACRES PER DAY. rS WHAT THEY SAID Id sure like to have "If a salesman had tried "If 1 saw this in a film 1 "You proved to me that the "You can always put figures my brother-in-law to tell me this, 1 wouldn't wouldn't believe it. But 23° angle on the tread is on paper But I've seen these see this. He thinks have believed it. But 1 gotta say seeing is a lot more important than tests and 1 believe it That all tires are the same. I've seen it and I'm a believing. When you 1 had any idea it was'.' horsepower transfer to You sure proved to believer" show me 1 can get Vallie Pellett your drawbar really proved me Firestone 23° Joe Brand another hour's work in 2,000 acres it to me'.' tires give a lot more 950 acres a day or go fishing, It Atlantic, la. Roger Cwach work than the others" Columbus, Ind. doesn't take much to 1,200 acres Travis "Red" Parker convince me 1 should Yankton, S. D. 10,350 acres do it'.' Drew, Miss. Wally Wagner 750 acres Wayne, O. You can save more [or less] depending on the amount of acres you plow per day and the time you work. WE'LL PROVE IT TO YOU. See your Firestone Dealer. Or send the coupon for the complete story about our tractor tire testing center and the facts which prove that Firestone 23° tractor tires can save you time and money City Stale Zip Mail to: Five Farmers, Firestone, Akron, Ohio 44317 The Field & Road "■' The All Traction Field & Road ''' The Deep Tread Pfi#l««# 23° Tractor Tires April-May 1973 The National Future Farmer VOLUME 21 NUMBER 4 APRIL-MAY, 1973 Looking Ahead Chapter Scoop Departments 6 FFA In Action 36 Joke Page 37 42 Agri-Emphasis: Livestoci( Turkeys With Class 10 Leaders In Sheep 14 Three-Sows To Full-Scale 12 Driving Forty Down Town 18 Pen Of Five 1 9 Otiier Features Taking The Lead 8 A Lasting Tribute 30 FFA Explorers 20 A Tour Of Rural Life 33 What Will 73 Bring 22 They Can Split A Second 34 Experience In Production 28 A Garb Shop 41 Our Cover Steve Norman, a district Star Farmer from Montevideo, Minnesota, studies the fertilizer setting on a bulk spreader truck v/ith Mr. Mike Jorgenson, manager of the local Farmers Union Soil Service Center. Steve, currently chapter president, feeds around 75 steers annually in a 50-50 partnership and manages a 300-hog operation on a one-third to two-thirds basis v^ith his father. He rents 80 acres of cropland on his own. Two Montevideo members have worked at the fertilizer plant under the agribusiness occupational experience training program. One Is still employed with the co-op, but at the agriculture petroleum division. Photo by Ron Miller MAGAZINE STAFF Editor, Wilson W. Carnes; Associate Editors, John M. Pitzer, Ronald A. Miller; Editorial As- sistants, Twila Renirie, Patricia Martin; Circula- tion Assistants, Norma Salvatore, Teri Conyer, Adriana Stagg; Promotion Assistant, Dell Fore- hand; Advertising Manager, Glenn D. Luedke; Regional Advertising Managers, Duane G. Leach, Richard A. Wright ; Advertising Assistant, Laurie Welch. NATIONAL OFFICERS National President, Dwight Seegmiller, Iowa National Secretary, Jerry Goolsby, Oklahoma National Vice Presidents, Tim Daugherty, Mii souri, Bruce Erath, New York, Zane Hanser Idaho, Robert Hinton, Florida. BOARD OF DIRECTORS Chairman of the Board of Director's, National Advisor, H. N. Hunsicker; Members of the Board, Gerald F. Barton, J. L. Branch, H. E. Edwards. Philip A. Haight, John W. Lacey, J. R. Feddi- cord, Byron F. Rawls, J. W. Warren. NATIONAL STAFF Executive Secretary, William Paul Cray; Na- tional Treasurer, J. M. Campbell; Executive Director, Edward J. Hawkins; Controller, V. Stanley Allen: Associate Executive Secretary, Coleman Harris; Manager of International Pro- grams, Lennie Gamage : Manager of Contests and Awards, Robert Seefeldt; Associate Manager of Contests and Awards, Earl Wineinger; Director of Information, Daniel Reuwee ; Acting Manager of FFA Supply Service, Harry J. Andrews; Ad- ministrative Secretary of FFA Alumni Associa- tion, Jay Benham. ADVERTISING OFFICES Tlie National FUTURE FARMER P.O. Box 15130 Alexandria. Virflinia 22309 Whaley-Slmpson Company 6725 Sunset Boulevard Los Angeles, California 90028 703-360-3600 213-463-7157 415-761-4583 CHANGE OF ADDRESS Send both old and new addresses to Circulation Dept., Tlie National FUTURE FARMER, P.O. Box 15130. Alexandria, Virginia 22300. CORRESPONDENCE Address all correspondence to: The NATIONAL FUTURE FARMER, P.O. Box 15130. Alexandria. Virginia 22309. Offices are located at ttie National FFA Center on U.S. Route One. eiplit miles south of Alexandria. Tlie Nationnt FUTURE FARMER is published bi- monthly by the Future Farmers of America at Alex- andria. VIn 'nla 22300. Second class postage paid at Alexandria, Virginia, and at additional mailing offices. Copyright 1973 by the Future Farmers of America. Single subscription, SI. 00 per year in U.S. and pos- sessions. Single copies. 20c, Foreign subscriptions, 51.00 plus oOe extra for postage. Is Vo-Ag the Answer? HIGH food prices are getting a lot of attention. Isn't this the best reason yet for continuing a strong national program of vocational education in agriculture? Since 1917, this country has had a fed- erally initiated program of vocational edu- cation in agriculture, and the FFA was founded in 1928 as an outgrowth of it. Both have contributed significantly over the years to the food producing capacity of this country. How high would food prices be if we had not had them? In recent years, vocational agriculture in many schools has included processing and marketing as well as other areas of agri- business — along with farming and ranching. To help keep food prices as low as pos- sible for the American consumer we need people trained to produce and market food efficiently. The high schools of this coun- try must continue to offer vocational agri- culture and FFA with strong federal and state support. Many of you are 18 — and voters — so you can help do this. National Officers in Congress Two former national FFA officers are serving their first term in Congress. They are Congressman William D. Gunter, Jr., (D-Fla.), national FFA president 1954-55; and Congressman Jerry Litton, (D-Mo.), na- tional secretary 1956-57. Both are on the House Agricultural Committee. Spanton Receives VIP Citation Dr. W. T. Spanton served as national FFA advisor from 1941 to 1961. Last year, the FFA awarded him their VIP Citation which was presented by Tim Daugherty while on the National Officer Tour. Dr. Spanton was present when the FFA was organized in 1928 and made many significant contribu- tions to its development. He is now retired and lives in Richmond, Virginia. WUiott 6a/iHU, Editor The National FUTURE FARMER Bert PriskThe man who invented a heart. At the General Motors Re- search Laboratories near Detroit, a number of projects extend beyond the automobile. Many of the people who work there are pursuing research in areas they hadn't dreamed of when they joined GM. Bert Prisk is one of these people. His background is Electrical Engineering, and maybe you'd expect him to be designing new ignition sys- tems. But Bert's project is en- tirely different. For several years now, Bert has been de- veloping an inexpensive dis- posable heart pump. Using fairly common materi- als and an uncommon imagina- tion, Bert has devised a simple and ingenious solution toaseri- ous medical problem. Bert's heart pump had been tested at veterinary hospitals and may soon be working to help save human lives in hospitals around the country. Whether he's furthering medical technology at work, or relaxing with a good opera at home, Bert Prisk is a good ex- ample of the kind of people who work for GM. The kind of people who use fresh in- sights and deter- mination to im- prove the quality of life for all of us. General Motors Interesting people doing interesting things. Ai>ril-May 1973 Over ""5,000 in prizes A^varded Hiontiily Draw the Pirate Let the Pirate help you test your talent. You may win one of five 5.00 Commercial Art Scholarships or any one of one hun- dred .00 cash prizes. Draw the Pirate any size except like a tracing. Use pencil. Every qualified entrant receives a free professional estimate of his art talent. Scholarship winners get the complete home study course in commercial art taught by Art Instruction Schools, Inc., one of America's leading home study art schools. Try for an art scholarship in advertising art and illustrating, cartooning or painting. Your entry will be judged in the month received but not later than May 31, 1973. Prizes awarded for best drawings of var- ious subjects received from qualified 'entrants age 14 and over. One cash award for the best drawing from entrants age 12 and 13. No drawings can be re- turned. Our students and professional art- ists not eligible. Contest winners will be notified. Send your entry today. MAIL THIS COUPON TO ENTER CONTEST ART INSTRUCTION SCHOOLS, INC. Studio 3A-3540 • 500 South Fourth Street Minneapolis, Minnesota 55415 Please enter my drawing in your monthly contest Name (PLEASE PRJNT) Occupation, Address. City County- Telephone Number. Looking Ahead Livestock YOUTH PURCHASE PROGRAM— Loans of up to 0 for purchasing a registered Polled Hereford female are now available to any boy or girl under 21 years of age. The animal must be purchased from a breeder coop- erating in the Youth Purchase Program which entails a discount of 10 to 30 percent to young buyers. The note with an interest rate of 5 percent pay- able annually comes due in three years or prior to the date if the animal is sold. Interested youth are directed to write the Youth Director, American Polled Hereford Association, 4700 East 63rd Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64130 for information, rules, and application forms. NATIONAL DAIRY PROMOTIONS— The promotion efforts of the nation's dairy farmers were put together recently at the annual meeting of the United Dairy Industry Association. The action will consolidate the advertising program of the American Dairy Association, the nutrition re- search and education programs of the National Dairy Council, and the product research programs of Dairy Research, Inc. under single manage- ment. The parent organization is the United Dairy Industry Association, but each dairy organization will retain their corporate entities. PROJECTED BEEF PRODUCTION— The nation's beef supply is pro- jected at 29 billion pounds in 1980. The key to the increase in beef supply will be the enlargement of the beef cow herd from 37 million to 46 million over the next seven years. This expansion will match the consumer needs for beef and raise per capita consumption from 1 14 pounds to 126 pounds. COMMODITY MARGINS CHANGE — Minimum margin requirements for live cattle, live hogs, shell egg, and lumber futures contracts were raised recently by governors of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. The decision was made because of expanded price ranges and increased price volatility. Chairman Barry J. Lind of the exchange clearing house commit- tee says, "This step informs the public that the market is more speculative." Crops FARMER CROP PROBLEMS — Due to the general poor harvesting con- ditions of last year worries about 1972 crops still are not over. (Problem 1 ) As warm weather approaches corn in storage is now beginning to spoil, reports Mr. Larry Van Fossen, an Iowa State agricultural engineer. This leaves the farmer with the following options: market the corn; dry the grain; re-store ground ear or shelled corn in a silo; treat grain with a pre- servative; or gamble the corn will keep. (Problem 2) Soybean seed supply will be lower in the coming year, says Mr. William Murphy, agronomy spe- cialist at the University of Missouri. Later harvested beans have undergone changes in the field resulting in poor germination. Farmers are, therefore, urged to test earlier harvested beans which usually germinate well. WHEAT KERNEL FRACTIONATED— The whole wheat kernel has been successfully fractionated without changing its natural state by Far- Mar-Co of Hutchinson, Kansas, supported by the Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Wheat Commission. The process is both technically and economically feasible in the recovery of wheat gluten. During the research the company also discovered methods for fortify- wheat protein with amino acids, isolating pentosans from bran, and chang- ing gluten to meat flavor enhancers. According to Dr. Wayne Henry, re- search director, wheat utilization will provide wheat farmers with increased profitability. Management FARM DEBT DOUBLING — Farmers are expected to drive up outstand- ing farm debt to 7 billion by 1980 — double the 1970 mark, as pro- jected by the Federal Reserve Board in the Agricultural Finance Review. Summing up the increases in farmland prices, machinery costs, and build- ing expenses, the farmers total annual capital flow is expected to reach .7 billion by 1980 — up more than 50 percent from 1970. Farmers gen- erally meet 60 percent of these capital needs with out-of-pocket spending, but borrowing for the rest will up farm credit by 7 percent a year. The Natiorml FUTURE FARMER How to get the most out of the next 4 years. Set yourself up — with a good paying lifetime skill. The Air Force makes it possible by letting you make your choice from more than 100 jobs, from aircraft mechanic to Medical Services specialist, before you enlist. And if your choice is available, trains you — and pays you while you learn. You get yourself a job you want. One that'll give you a rewarding career — in or out of service. Because you'll develop the skill and gain the experience that civilian employers prize. Live it up —with 30-day paid vacations.Travel. A paycheck that grows as fast as your experience grows. A salary that goes further because you get dental and medical care. Free food, clothing and housing. Money-saving buys at our commissaries and exchanges. And no worries about business setbacks that could eliminate your job. You can even get a higher education if you decide to pursue it. All the important de- tails are all yours when you see your local Air Force Recruiter. Or call 800-447-4700, toll free (m Illinois.call 800-322-4400). Or fill out and mail in the coupon. If you qualify, the next 4 years can qualify you for life. Find yourself in the 2Ur Force. Air Force Opportunities 1 NF 43 Box A Randolpli AFB, Texas 78148 Please send me more information. 1 understand tliere is no obligation. Name Address City_ State Zip_ (Please Prim) ^;S4>^ yVQbl Pennsylvania President Nelson Martin, left, accompanied Bruce to Robert Campbell's farm, regional dairy winner. NATIONAL FFA Officers traveled to a total of 325 chapters in 20 states during a six-week practical ex- perience program. The training program was de- signed to better prepare them for their year in office. The activities broaden their knowledge, understanding, and ap- preciation of the FFA and vocational agriculture education. Most of the visits were one-day stops. However, each officer spent one week with the members and advisors of an outstanding chapter in various parts of the country. Each officer led vocational agriculture classes in dis- cussions about the FFA, made home visits, and attended chapter meetings. They further appeared before student body assemblies, adult organization meetings, and on lo- cal broadcasting networks. But the national officers turned the tables to interview school teachers, administrators, and other town leaders. Yet another aspect of their experience was participating in the planning of four-year occupational programs for students. The feelings of the national officers plus those of chapter members and advisors illustrate the value of this training. Relating to Members FFA President Dwight Seegmiller spent a week with the New Ulm FFA, the largest chapter in Minnesota. After participating in the planning of farm programs with stu- dents and their advisors he says, "I feel now I can relate more efficiently to high school members." While spending a week at the Prairie Heights FFA in LaGrange, Indiana, Central Regional Vice President Tim Daugherty toured chapter livestock research projects and environmental nature trails. Like the other officers he visited the homes of farm and non-farm FFA members. "The ad- visor purposely left the orientation of the chapter up to the members," reports Tim, "and they let me know what they felt was important to them as a chapter." "The school assembly and student council meeting were very useful in informing students of the FFA and learning what they think about it," says Southern Regional Vice President Robert Hinton, who stayed for a week at the Saline, Louisiana, Chapter. Bob further talked about FFA and vocational agriculture with youth at chapter meetings, in church activities, on radio and TV, and at their homes. Learning from Adults Each officer conducted interviews with several adults during their stay. "My interviews helped me find out how much people know about vocational agriculture and FFA," reports Zane Hansen, vice president of the Pacific Region. "They also permitted me to clarify any questions they had concerning FFA." All totaled Zane interviewed seven peo- ple at Cody, Wyoming — including the school administrator, student counsellor, school teachers, and community leaders. While staying with the Sulphur Springs, Texas, Chapter, National FFA Secretary Jerry Goolsby had the opportunity to talk with Dr. N. K. Quarles, head of the Agricultural Mr. Wayne Salyean, the high school principal, was one of the Sulphur Springs residents interviewed by Jerry. Taking the Lead Your national officers began their term with this practical experience program. By Ron Miller Education Department at East Texas State University. "In talking with Dr. Quarles I learned a lot about the relation- ship of agricultural education to vocational agriculture and the FFA," says Jerry. He also conversed with members of the collegiate FFA chapter and spoke at business organiza- _ tional meetings in Sulphur Springs. Bruce Erath, vice president of the North Atlantic Region, talked with elementary and junior high students as well as senior high groups in New Holland, Pennsylvania, home of the Grassland FFA. His stay was planned by Dr. Robert Herr, chairman of the agriculture department. "Learning how agriculture education is being extended from kinder- garten through adults was a great learning process," says Bruce. "My week, likewise, helped me understand the vo- cational agriculture teachers role as well as the students." Thoughts to Remember Advisor Ned Stump of the Prairie Heights FFA says, "Tim's visit was a shot in the arm to our chapter. We really appreciated it. The impact he made with his address to the student body on closed circuit television was tremendous." "I learned a lot from Dwight," says Advisor Frank Stucky of New Ulm. "It was the greatest experience of my career." Finally, as one of the national officers expresses it, "The home visits, the school discussions, and company tours gave me a preview of what to expect during my year in office." Greenhand Kevin Finstad and Dwight design a four-year plan of Kevin's agricultural work experience program. The National FUTURE FARMER. Winchester pride and performance in modesriy priced^ semi-automatic 22 rim fire rifles Model 290 Winchester Proof-Steel barrels . . . adjustable rear sights . . . high strength receivers grooved for tip-off scope mounting Hard-hitting performance as fast as you can pull the trigger ... in a Winchester made the way you want it, and at a price you'll want to pay. Varmint shooters, plinkers and target shooters have asked for a low-cost, high quality semi-automatic 22 rim fire; and they get just that in either our Model 290 or its even less expensive brother, the 190. Both shoot 17 Longs or 15 Long Rifles. Both have coldformed Winchester Proof- Steel barrels and high strength receivers grooved for tip-off scope mounting. Adjust- able rear sights. Bead post front sights. Cross-bolt safetys. And both feature bold pistol grip stocks and crisply styled forearms of walnut-finished American hardwood . . . plus tough composition butt plate with white spacer. The 290 is richly checkered on the pistol grip and forearm. April-May 1973 For bolt, slide and lever action enthusiasts, Winchester also produces a full line of modestly priced 22 rifles with Winchester quality features. Sporting arms with built-in strength and accuracy for all small bore sports. But whatever action you prefer in a rim- fire, check out the Winchester models at your dealer. After you see how great they look and feel and handle, you'll be surprised at the price. 'WmCff£5T£R-iiSWm. 275 Winchester Avenue, New Haven, Conn. 06504 Winchester the way you want it Agri-Emphasis: Livestock Growing Turkeys with Class This producer proves top management works. Eddie's management records allow him +0 make timely production decisions. Eddie gets chores done at the range house much taster on this mini-bike. Mechanized feeding and automatic wa- tering keep Eddie's turkeys gaining. Staff Photos WHY is Eddie Bowman of the Turner Ashby FFA at Dayton, Virginia, a two-time state win- ner of the National Turkey Federation award? Why was he presented a 1971 Grower of the Month award by Marval Poultry, Inc., a nationally known pro- cessor located in Dayton? Why did Ed- die receive the Leadership and Agricul- tural Achievement honor from the Rockingham County Pro-Cal Division of Farm Bureau? The main reasons: His efficient tur- key production and leadership in FFA. Last year Eddie marketed one flock of 4,000 birds in which only 1.08 per- cent were condemned while 96 percent were of Grade A quality. Their feed efficiency factor was 3.01 pounds of feed per pound of gain. Just the year before Eddie obtained his best feed con- version ratio on 4,600 birds — a 2.66 efficiency factor. He has always main- tained a livability rate of 90-92 percent. Eddie has been producing turkeys for four years now, and the young poul- tryman annually raise 10,000 birds in two flocks. He starts one batch in March and another in mid-October. "Upon receiving day-old chicks from as far away as Toronto, Canada, it is essential to get feed and water to the poults immediately," says Eddie. He uses a crushed pellet starter feed of 30 percent protein and hand feeds the supplement for two weeks. Medicated water is supplied from a tank with an electric motor and pressure gauge in- stalled by Eddie. Thereafter until Eddie's turkeys are eight-weeks old they are fed via a power take-off operated grain trailer which augers feed into the feeders. The purchased feed ration — based on pro- tein requirements and price — is mixed according to a computer. During the summer the turkeys are moved outside until they are sold at 18 weeks of age. Turkeys on feed in the winter are moved into range houses. The range houses feature the relatively new practice of cross ventilation by na- tural means through curtains. The entire Bowman operation encom- passes housing facilities for 50,000 turkeys. Eddie and his father produce almost 140,000 turkeys a year. Their facilities include one automatically fed range house, five 48- x 200-foot semi- automatically fed range houses, and one 48- X 300-foot brooder house. The brooder house is separated into three sections to handle a total of 18,000 birds, and each range house holds 6,000 turkeys. The Bowmans can transfer 6,000 tur- keys from the brooder house to a range house in less than two hours. Using doors especially designed for stock trucks, they herd the turkeys directly into a truck and haul them to a range house. All of the houses are easily cleaned with a mini-loader. Eddie and his father operate an ad- joining 180 acres to the 130-acre Bow- man home farm. They raise 50 acres of corn, 20 acres of hay, and pasture 175 acres. In addition to their turkey operation, Eddie and his father began purchasing IVi year-old Angus heifers a few years ago. Of the current 80-head herd, Eddie owns 16 registered heifers. They antici- pate reaching 150 cows and selling 100 feeder calves annually. The beef herd is fed corn silage from four silos with electrically operated feeders. The cattle are housed in open sheds, fed hay in the winter, and pas- tured during the summer. In FFA, Eddie participated on the farm mechanics team and in poultry judging — placing second in the Rock- ingham Federation contest and fourth in the state. He also exhibited many first place turkeys at the county fair and won a trip to the American Insti- tute of Cooperatives by placing third in the FFA public speaking contest. Eddie played shortstop on the Turner Ashby AA State Champion baseball team. But these activities are but a few for this FFA member as he served as assistant vice president and assistant president for his chapter. Un^ler the guidance of Advisors R. Z. Arey and Charlie Shiflet, Jr., Eddie went on to excel in the offices of vice president and president in the Turner Ashby Chapter and secretary in the Rockingham Coun- ty FFA Federation. "The FFA is an organization where you have to push yourself," remarks Eddie. "Your advisors help you along, but you need to do the work." Last fall the young livestock producer began classes at Virginia Polytechnic Institute. Eddie, already a member of both the National and Virginia Turkey Federations, is majoring in poultry and animal science with the idea of farm- ing full-time after graduation. The National FUTURE FARMER It used to be that worming a horse was a major ordeal— for you and for your horse. Not any more. Because now there is Banminth. No other horse wormer is so safe, so effective, and so easy to use. Broad spectrum effectiveness Banminth kills over 50 kinds of worms. Large strongyles, small strongyles, roundworms, pinworms. Banminth gets them all. It's the fast, hard-hitting, broad-spectrum treatment. Extremely safe Banminth can be used in horses of all ages, including can be used concurrently with insecticides, muscle relaxants, tranquilizers, and drugs that depress the central nervous system. In safety tests, Banminth was used at several times the recommended dosage with no toxicity. It tastes good No more tube worming. Even your fussiest eaters will like Banminth because it's made with a sweet sucrose base. Just sprinkle it over the grain ration. Banminth is packaged in premeasured doses to make it the easiest of all wormers to use. '"ly Banminth . . . you'll never have to choose n m 1 nt rr Never before has such an effective wormer been so safe to use. Bamviinfth' Hexsb Warner • 3«te tM@«»«e ti reoorraOBniM » Cowwwrt Mee-oa at ««jB4nitti!aK, This coupon worth one free package of Banminth Mail this coupon to us, along with the latiel from a package of Banminth. We'll send you a certificate good for a free package of Banminth. Home Address_ City State. Zip Code_ IVIail to Banminth P.M., Agricultural Division, 235 E. 42nd St., New York, N. Y. 10017. Agri-Emphasis: Livestock Taking a Three-Sow Program to Full-Scale The very day this young farmer came to vocational agricuUure class he set out to be a top-notch hogman. By Ron Miller Dennis' animal health practices are crucial in his efforts to maintain a high weaning average. IN hopes of a career in farming af- ter high school, Dennis Johnson of Litchfield, Minnesota, began FFA with three sows less than five years ago. This past year Dennis finished out 445 hogs, and this year he intends to market 800 hogs. He was able to jump his production only because he was ready for full-scale production the day he graduated from vocational agriculture. Dennis began his three-sow program in partnership with his father. The young FFA member kept his share of Dennis discusses his hog program with the FFA magazine's associate editor. the gilts from the first farrowing and sold the barrows to pay for his half of the production costs plus the forth- coming expenses on the gilts. Dennis' dad sold his half of the second farrow- ing to the young producer, and Dennis continued marketing barrows and keep- ing all the gilts he could afford. Meanwhile, Dennis borrowed money from the bank to build two farrowing units during his freshman year and two more as a sophomore. He added an- other house later, finally enabling him to handle his present capacity of 30 sows and 30 gilts. All of the units in- clude six pens with guard rails and heat lamps. A cement weaning and breeding lot lies adjacent to the farrowing houses. Dennis, already a chapter Star Farm- er, took his biggest step in the spring of his junior year by going into debt to build a fully-cemented finishing unit. "Though not operating at capacity dur- ing my senior year because of school, I put the facility into full production last summer when I graduated," says the en- terprising hogman. The new finishing setup includes a hutch capable of holding 270 market hogs on feed at one time. A cement, 66- X 72-foot sloping platform is lo- cated in front of the 16- x 72-foot, steel covered hutch. Dennis' hog operation is situated on a 1 Vi -acre plot of ground on his father's farm. Upon building the finishing set- up, the young pork producer bought the land outright from his father and man- ages it himself. To feed his growing hog numbers Dennis worked cash rented land. He used his dad's machinery and in return helped on the family farm. About 3Vi years ago Dennis purchased a large tractor which his father, too, used for planting crops. Dennis presently owns a two-ton grinder-mixer mill (40 per- cent) and a welder (50 percent) in partnership with his dad. Recently he traded for a new tractor and a 1973 pickup truck, plus purchasing a skid loader to clean and scrape the feedlots. Dennis uses two dryers, each with a 3,500-bushel capacity, and an 8,500- bushel bin to store his grain. After grinding feed he unloads it directly from the grinder-mixer into two 90- bushel feeders located at the low end of the new finishing platform. The hog producer's practices include many acquired while studying voca- tional agriculture taught by Instructors Ken Stark and Winton Nelson. Some key practices are clipping teeth, giving iron, leptospirosis, and erysipelas shots, and worming. Dennis, a Minnesota The National FUTURE FARMER Livestock Proficiency award winner, pays particular attention tQ the selection of the three boars used in his breeding program. According to FFA Advisor Stark four things have made Dennis' program go. "First, Dennis has realistic plans for the future. Secondly, he carefully rein- vests profits into the business. Third, the encouragement of his parents and teachers helped. But most important the operation and responsibility are entirely Dennis'." After high school graduation Dennis enrolled in the Minnesota Adult Farm Management program. He received his first analysis in 1971, and the print out showed his labor earnings were .42 per hour, based on his total number of work units and net profit. It also re- vealed he produced a pound of pork for 12 cents and received a net return of 9 cents per pound of pork produced. His sows farrowed an average of 9.2 pigs and weaned 8.6 pigs per litter. "Last year I was able to rent a 200- acre farm. The farm has 160 tillable acres on which I plan to grow 130 acres of corn and 30 acres of oats," says Dennis. "I also started a purebred breeding program with 15 Yorkshire gilts and three Hampshire gilts." With results and records like those mentioned here, Dennis proves a sys- tematic farming program can work. His next expansion goals : Ship 1 ,000 market hogs yearly, build a 60-sow farrowing unit, and sell feeder cattle. Advisor Ken Stark, left, high school agriculture teacher, Winton Nelson, adult -farmer program instructor, and Dennis study hogs in new finishing pens. Color Photos by Author The hogman augers feed directly from the grinder-mixer into self-feeders. April-May 1973 Agri-Emphasis: Livestock IN the eastern mountains of West Virginia lies Pendleton County, the leading sheep producing area in the state. Here the Circleville FFA Chap- ter has set up a program to improve the quality of sheep produced. The local bank in Petersburg provides 0 for financing a sheep ring — as many sheep as money will afford — in cooperation with the chapter. Last year two members of the chapter each re- ceived four ewes. A committee of FFA members suggests which members should receive the sheep, and an adult committee makes the final selection. According to the agreement the sheep become the property of the member upon returning an equal number or dol- lar value to the chapter sheep ring. In case of unforeseen loss to the member the bank covers the deficit next year. One of the members to receive these sheep was Dave Bennett of Onego. Starting in vo-ag with six head, Dave now owns 17 registered Suf folks which he purchased from his father, plus the four from the sheep ring. Dave winters his ewes on alfalfa hay but begins feeding grain about one month before lambing. His ewes are bred to lamb in early April. This registered sheep breeder feeds his lambs 50-50 corn to oats ration with molasses mixed in. He uses a masculator on the young rams and raises the market lambs to 110 pounds. The health of his flock is Dave's prime concern. He purchases many of While he feeds Dave checks bred ewes closely as lambing season approaches. Leaders In Sheep Members of this chapter are using a sheep ring to upgrade their stock. his veterinary supplies from the chap- ter, who buys veterinary medicine from a wholesale distributor. This encour- ages proper disease control and enables Dave and other FFA members to save money. "Stock supplies are limited to wormers, vaccine, antibiotics, and in- struments like masculators and syr- inges," reports Advisor Michael Yo- kum. "We can, however, purchase oth- er needed supplies by special order." Another indication of the Circleville Chapter's stress on sheep production is evident in the Pendleton County Fair held behind the high school. Members set up pens, stalls, and exhibit areas for crops and vegetables. Only a few cattle and hogs are exhibited but over 70 head of sheep are shown at the fair each year. The fair also includes car- nival stands operated by community and high school clubs. Dave, whose father teaches reading to fifth through eighth graders, keeps his sheep on his grandfather's 60Q,-acre farm. Because the farm is in the moun- tains the land consists of 250 acres of pasture, 75 acres of crops — mostly hay and some corn — and woodland. In exchange for use of the land, Dave helps his grandfather manage a herd of 35 Hereford stock cows. His grand- father sells approximately thirty 500- pound feeders annually, and he runs about 250 head of sheep on the farm. Dave furnishes 50 percent of the sup- plies and feed for his sheep. His grand- father does the same, plus supplying 100 percent of the housing and farm equipment. The only equipment needed on the farm are two tractors, two wag- ons, and a hay baler. Dave's labor, which more than off- sets the difference, permits him to pur- chase additional ewes from his grand- father each year. Diligently involved in Circleville FFA activities, Dave handled the finances of the chapter as treasurer and was a member of the parliamentary proce- Dave repairs the lambing pens be- fore hanging heat lamps in them. dure team. Moreover, he received both the chapter Star Greenhand and Star Farmer awards. Another of his contributions came in the contest area. Dave participated in land and poultry judging — helping his chapter earn the sweepstakes honor in the state contest for the second year in a row. Upon winning the West Virginia FFA Poultry Judging contest, Dave and his teammates went on to place second in poultry and egg judging at the Northeastern Poultry Producers Council Organization meeting. Dave won a bronze medal in poultry judging at the National FFA Convention. The sheep breeder is an avid sports- man as well as a motorcyclist. Being a deer hunter and owner of three rifles, Dave served as chairman of the chap- ter's annual shooting match. Last fall Dave, a recipient of the State Farmer degree, began attending Potomac State College at Keyser. He will be studying agriculture there for two years with current plans of return- ing to the farm and raising sheep. Advisor Yokum helps Dave to trim the hooves of his registered Suffolk ram. Staff Photos The National FUTURE FARMER Wrangler thinks you spend too much for boots. (And we're doing S9iiiething gbout it. i^';-'"^ // We're making boots like they did in the good old days. And pricing them like they did then, too. From to . Wrangler Boots.Wremember the^'W'is silent. Granada Avenue, Nashville, Tennessee 37206, ©1973 Blue Bell. Inc. Live and woiic in places tourists only visit. Europe, Hawdii, Panama, Alaska, Korea. How many people do you know who can really spend some time there? Stay long enough to get to know the people? Make friends? Enjoy the. special places only natives know? Maybe you can. Many jobs in todays Army can get you there. Jobs we'll tram you to do. In almost any field you can name. Taught by excellent instructors in good schools with the best equipment around. Jobs we'll pay you to learn. At a starting salary of 7.20 a month (before deductions). With promotions and raises as fast as you earn them. Add free meals, free housing, free clothing, free medical and dental care. And a 30 days paid vacation every year Which you can spend abroad while stationed there. If you are looking for a good job that will take you places, send us the coupon, or talk it over with your nearest Army Representative. TVldaif^ AnHV wants to loin you. Army Opportunities 2NFF 4-73-U PO, Box 5510, Philadelphia, PA 19143 I'd like to know more about |ob-training and promotion in today's Army. City County- State Zip (Please pnnt all information) April-May 1973 A highlighl' for Paul was driving the 40 horses in the July 4 Circus Parade. A SIX-FOOT, curly-haired, FFA member from Zearing, Iowa, sat atop a white and gold Barnum and Bailey Circus wagon, holding five sets of reins in his sturdy hands as he drove 40 Belgian draft horses down the streets of Milwaukee, Wisconsin! The handsome, costumed circus bandwagon driver is Paul Sparrow, the 17-year-old son of Dick Sparrow, an Iowa Belgian horse breeder. Paul's fa- ther revived the historic 40-horse hitch this past summer for the 10th anniver- sary of the annual Fourth of July Cir- cus Parade in Milwaukee. "That was one of the most exciting moments of my life!" exclaims the am- bitious farm youth as he reminisces about his summer experiences. Alto- gether, he served as back-up driver to his father during the four Midwest pub- lic appearances of the 40-horse hitch. Though he is ordinarily a quiet and modest youth, Paul displays great pride in his father's skill in handling a 40- horse hitch, a feat not accomplished since the 1904 Barnum and Bailey cir- cus parades. "My job is simply to relieve Dad when he gets tired," explains Paul. And that couldn't be too often for the FFA youth who finds an excitement in every job demanded of him in preparing and driving the hitch. Paul states the 40-horse hitch idea 18 Agri-Emphasis: Livestock Driving Forty Down Town This member did it! Not with a car mind you, but with a 40-horse hitch. By Rod Vahl originated with Robert A. Uihlein, Jr., president of the Schlitz Brewing Com- pany of Milwaukee, the firm which sponsors the annual circus parade event. The executive, who has an intense in- terest in animals and especially horses, contacted Paul's father about organizing a 40-horse hitch to pull a circus band- wagon in the parade. Without a moment's hesitation, Paul's father accepted the challenge and agreed to the company's sponsorship of the project. Immediately, the Spar- row family began to select and train 40 Belgian horses from their herd of over 60 Belgians. "It's exciting and a lot of hard work," smiles Paul who competently displays his ability to help supervise the chores of hitching up 40 Belgians which aver- age 2,000 pounds each. "We had to have everything made for the hitch — the harnesses, decorative gear, and even the circus costumes we wear during the parades," Paul adds. Before a parade Paul is busy helping hitch up the 40 Belgian draft horses. The hitch is organized with ten teams of four horses controlled by five lines in each hand of the driver. Paul ex- plains, "We have two lines that go to five teams — the first, second, fifth, eighth, and tenth teams." Paul points out that the toughest job is to control 40 horses while parading before crowds. There are ten horsemen who serve as outriders to control those crowds that converge upon parades. Paul's mother remembers two inci- dents in the Milwaukee parade and ex- plains, "A very small boy got away from his parents and ran out into the street. Luckily he ran into the front legs of one of the outriders. Otherwise he would have been crushed to death un- der the weight of the Belgians. The other near-accident involved a photo- grapher who was lying on the street taking pictures. The horses swerved a bit toward him and one of the out- riders quickly nudged the Belgians the other way!" Feeding the 40 horses at the events this summer was a tremendous chore for the Sparrow family. Paul says, "We used 700 pounds of grain a day to feed them." At least 25 extra men were hired to help care for the horses and prepare them for the four events. Be- sides the Milwaukee parade, the ap- pearances included the Illinois State Fair, the National Belgian Horse Show at the Great Mississippi Valley Fair in Davenport, Iowa, and finally back home in Zearing for the annual Labor Day Horse Show. Though Paul did not have much ex- tra time to show his own Belgian horses, he did enter his three mares and a stallion in the halter classes at the National Belgian Horse Show. "My stallion foal took first place, and I got a couple of thirds with the others," remarks the young horseman. Having raised 20 head of cattle for his FFA program last year, Paul is The National FUTURE FARMER strongly thinking of including his Bel- gian horses in his farming program. He says, "I like horses, but I like all other aspects of farming, too." The 1 80-pound varsity basketball for- ward at Northeast Story County High School in Zearing is confident about his future in saying, "I want to farm. I want to be my own boss and do the things I want to do, not what someone else is always telling me to do. I can't imagine myself working in a factory where I wouldn't feel a sense of ac- complishing something I wanted to do." His present plans are to attend Iowa State University after high school grad- uation and to study agricultural busi- ness. He then plans to join his dad's farm operations which include 1,100 acres for raising grain and livestock. Though the FFA youth is busy every day, he feels he has an advantage over many city youths and says, "Many kids today don't have enough to occupy their time and energy. It's hard work on a farm, especially in raising a lot of Bel- gians and other horses, but it's taught me a sense of responsibility." However, Paul is no different than many young persons, and he admits that he has experienced some of the typical youth problems. He says, "There was a time when I couldn't communi- cate easily with Dad. But now we try to function together. We just sit down and start to hassle, and it isn't long before we are communicating." The Sparrow family ties are strong and Paul points out, "By working to- gether and trying to understand each other things work out. My dad has been with horses all his life, and he has taught me a lot about them. My grand- pa has helped me, too, because he raised Belgians years ago." Whether it's driving a team of 40 Belgians down city streets, raising cat- tle, or riding his favorite quarter horse across farm pastures, Paul Sparrow is always learning. Here Paul shows one of the mares he entered in the National Belgian Show. Agri-Emphasis: Livestock Pen of Five These five put money together to feed cattle. Front left: Jimmy, Dale, Ronnie, Tommy, and Jady. Back left: Advisor Turnbough, Dr. Kraus, Mr. Hicks. BOUT a year ago five Clovis, New Mexico, FFA members be- gan an innovative beef program. Undertaken as an extension of their vocational agriculture education, the FFA members planned a cooperative business venture from ideas gained in commercial livestock classes. Tommy Williams, Dale Petty, and Jimmy Black (all 1972 graduates) along with Ronnie Montague and Jady Bell (seniors this year) borrowed over ,000 from Clovis banks and credit associations to begin a feeder cattle venture. With the help of their parents and Advisor Jim Turnbough they ob- tained 125 head of "Oakie" heifers and placed them with the Bovina Feeders, Inc., a commercial feedlot. The quintet agreed that after the cattle were fattened, sold, and all bills paid, any net profit or loss would be split equally between them. Their feedlot performance record sheet shows the following data: Purchased — February 26 1972. Average purchase weight — 429 pounds Cost per hundredweight — .41 Fed — 147 days Daily rate of gain — 2.39 pounds Cost per pound gained (excluding in- terest) — .2145 cents Sold— July 28, 1972 Average selling weight — 780 pounds Selling price per cwt. — .00 Death Loss — .8 percent Average feed cost per ton — .35 Net profit per head (without inter- est)— .77 Net profit per head (less interest) — .68 The members feel particularly for- tunate to have had top professional as- sistance from Dr. E. E. Kraus, owner April-May 1973 of a veterinary clinic in Clovis and consulting veterinarian for the feedlot, and from Mr. Lee Hicks, manager of Bovina Feeders, Inc. The monetary gain in this instance was favorable. But the real profit, they concede, is measured by the experience derived from the project. Mr. Hicks points out that the five young cattlemen were treated no dif- ferently than any other feedlot custo- mer. However, the FFA members re- ceived a full explanation of feedlot pro- cedures and sale recommendations. "Acceptance of the financial respon- sibility is the key to the whole project," Mr. Hicks states. "They learned how to handle their money, their cattle, about market fluctuations, and the cattle in- dustry in general." According to Advisor Turnbough, the idea was "an outgrowth of the pen-of- five event held the previous fall at the Curry County Fair." The pen division proved to be one of the most education- al programs connected with the county fair for some time. Dr. Kraus, who has worked with the Clovis FFA for years, is enthusiastic about the far-flung advantages derived from the feedlot project. He says, "It puts to practical use what they've learned in the classroom." When asked about borrowing so much money, the members commented it wasn't the point of borrowing so much as it was the reality of having to pay it back that struck home to them. "But now that we've got it all paid off, we definitely have a good credit rat- ing," one proudly states. Plans are currently being finalized for the purchase of a second feeder herd by other Clovis FFA members. (By John Meador, Secretary) 19 Members of Mil+on-Freewater, Oregon, FFA examined a sow feeder during their visit in Charles City, Iowa. Hartington, Nebraska, members told their new friends at PIsinview, Minnesota, about the chapter back home. FFA EXPLORERS Chapter-to-chapter exchanges let FFA'ers explore agricul- ture and swap ideas with other members across the nation. By Jack Pitzer WHEN 15 Milton-Freewater, Or- egon, FFA members visited the Wilber Miles turkey farm near Charles City, Iowa, they found out that he has raised 85,000 turkeys every year. "This was something new to us as no one raises turkeys in Milton." This chapter-to-chapter exchange idea is a unique and exciting way for young men and women to really see the broad scope of agriculture in our nation and to discover how other people live and work. The representatives also exchange ideas about FFA and effective chapter programs. News about FFA chapters sending representatives to each other's commu- nity for several day visits — even though they are miles apart — is emerging from a number of states. Chapters Getting Together The exchange between Milton-Free- water, Oregon, and Charles City, Iowa, began because the Iowa advisor had worked one summer in the pea harvest in Oregon. He met the Oregon advisor and they planned the exchange. When the Missoula, Montana, advi- sor attended a national leadership con- ference with his chapter president he visited with the Chestnut Ridge, Penn- sylvania, advisor. They set up an ex- change. Since then Missoula has ex- changed juniors (so they can be leaders in their senior year) with Cambridge, Wisconsin, Chapter. 20 Big Walnut FFA in Sunbury, Ohio, stopped and visited with the Hickman, Missouri, Chapter in Columbia, on the way to the National FFA Convention in Kansas City. Then Columbia went to Sunbury later in the year. Hood River, Oregon, FFA'ers went with their advisor to his home in Idaho. Swap Shop' The National FUTURE FARMER believes these chapter-to-chapter ex- changes are worthwhile. If your chap- ter is interested in getting together with another chapter, let us know. We'll maintain a list of chapters who have expressed an interest, then put them in touch with each other. Include in your letter the dates when you'd like to exchange, what major re- gion of the nation you are interested in, what kind of agriculture you are interested in learning more about, and how many members would likely be in your group. We will put advisors in touch with each other to work out all the details. We would also like to hear about any other chapter exchanges already being carried on. A chapter-to-chapter exchange would be an excellent way for your FFA to celebrate the American Bicentennial era. Our American heritage included exploration of the new. Your chapter can be part of the nationwide effort to get-to-know America better. Russellville, Missouri, planned an ex- tensive trip up into Colorado and Wy- oming and organized a one-night visit with the Burns, Wyoming, FFA. The Missourians visited cattle feedlots, large ranches, and camped in the mountains. What They Learn During March of last year Plainview, Minnesota, and Hartington, Nebraska, exchanged their chapter presidents plus representatives from each class. Each chapter group has a slide pres- entation about their community, FFA activities, and farming operations. While members were in Hartington or Plain- view they lived with host families and attended classes with the member they were living with. When the 1 6 members of Hood River, Oregon, went to Idaho with Advisor Gary Horn they stayed at his father's farm. They observed equipment needed on dryland farms and were impressed by the scope and size of operations they visited in the area. "We saw three of five brand new combines costing ,- 000 apiece." They also toured the University of Idaho and later made a presentation at the Troy, Idaho, school about the mod- ular system being used back at Hood River. When the ten members and advisors from Columbia, Missouri, Chapter had their return visit at Big Walnut, Ohio, they also stayed with host members. (Continued on Page 27) The National FUTURE FARMER Ask about our firee trial offer. x-^. N mmmm Signing up for Army ROTC in college is no big deal. No major commitment. All we'd like you to do is give it a try. Take the Basic Course during your freshman and sopho- more years. See what it's all about. You'll find that it's only a few hours a week. That's not going to get in the way of classes, study, sports or other activities. At the end of your sophomore year you'll know for sure. If you decide to go on with the ROTC Advanced Course you'll be paid 0 a month during your / last two years of school. You'll also be earning your degree and commission at the same time. It's even possible for you to go on to graduate school. Then serve as an officer later. Check out ROTC now. /■ A. Army ROTC . The more you look at it, the better it looks. / Army ROTC /^ P.O. Box 12703 y Philadelphia, Pa. 19134 Sure, I'll at least consider it. WHAT WILL '73 BRING? Agricultural economists differ widely on what will happen this year in the marketing of farm products. These expectations will cast open the future for you. STRONG domestic demand for livestock, huge grain exports, and short world supplies of protein feed are the key uncertainties for 1973. The fact, too, farmers recorded the highest net farm income in history last year — 19.2 billion, marks 1973 as a "what if" year. Using these factors economic fore- casters made the following outlook of the year ahead at the 51st USDA Na- tional Agricultural Outlook Conference in Washington, D.C. Their assessment of the future agricultural situation is summarized by The National FUTURE FARMER to help you in making up- coming production and management decisions. Agricultural Finance Expenses. Farmers will pay substan- tially higher prices for a number of production inputs this year. Sharply 22 The National FUTURE FARMER As you plant your crops or expand your livestock numbers you will won- der, as this FFA member does, what they will bring when you market them. Bon MUler Photo higher feed prices and increased re- placement livestock costs will be the main elements followed by fertilizer, seed, and petroleum. Credit demands will be higher boosting farm debt by 8 percent to .8 billion. Yet only fractional hikes are expected in inter- est rates. Incomes. Gross farm income will es- sentially keep pace with farm produc- tion expenses. Thus, net farm income will decrease slightly but stay in the neighborhood of billion. Crop ex- ports — mainly feed grain and soybeans — plus domestic meat consumption will be determining factors in the final in- come analysis. Farm assets will rise again in 1973, due to a continuing climb in farm real estate values. Livestock Predictions Beef. Beef output will be moderately larger than a year earlier. Fed cattle marketings will rise slightly, and cow slaughter will run about equal to last year. The rapidly accelerating growth of cow herds indicates farmers will meet the increasing demand for beef. With feeder cattle prices running at a record high, beef prices will decline some toward the end of 1973. However, cattle prices are expected to hold strong due to consumer demand. Hogs. Reflecting an expected in- crease in the pig crop, hog slaughter will run considerably larger than a year ago. Pork producers are expected to step up farrowings throughout the year. Hog prices, substantially higher than last year, will soften by the end of 1973 and drop below year earlier prices. Corn prices, too, will weaken so a favorable hog-corn price ratio will be maintained. Sheep and Lambs. Reflecting a re- duction in the number of ewes, the lamb crop will likely decline another 4 to 6 percent. Lamb slaughter will run a little under last year, and fed lamb prices will continue steady with the ex- ception of seasonal declines. Poultry and Eggs. The prospects for broiler production are cloudy because of higher feed prices, but the turkey crop will expand this year despite high- er feed costs. A smaller laying flock will April-May 1973 hold total egg output moderately below year earlier levels. Turkey prices are expected to rise but lag below last year's late price run- up. Meanwhile, broiler prices will like- ly hold moderately above last year's, and egg prices are expected to remain strong and average moderately higher. Dairy. Poor quality roughage and short feed supplies will limit milk pro- duction until new pasture and forage crops become available. Thus, milk production will be about the same or slightly lower than the 120.3 billion pounds produced last year. Milk out- put per cow, which rose only 2Vi per- cent last year, is expected to improve as farmers trim their herds in accord- ance with feed supplies. With milk prices averaging about .45 per hundred pounds, farmer prices promise to average about 4-5 percent more in 1973 than last year. This trend outlook hinges on dairy sup- ports being set at 75 percent of parity, no change in federal order pricing, and the ability of the dairy industry to main- tain or exceed last year's commercial product sales. Crop Projections Cotton. Despite a 13 percent drop in the national base acreage allotment, cot- ton plantings will total about 13.9 mil- lion acres, down only a half million. Expanding exports and attractive prices are predicted. The preliminary payment of 15 cents per pound is unchanged from last year. Feed Grains. Farmer acreage plans point to a record feed grain crop if the growing season is normal. Corn acreage will increase by 5 million acres — totaling 71.5 million acres and grain sorghum will rise by 1.7 million acres — equaling 19.1 million acres. Barley and oats seedings will change little. Prices on all feed grains will likely ease downward but remain above last year's until the new crop developments begin to unfold. Average yields are ex- pected to continue their steady rise. Rice. The acreage allotment for rice has been raised 10 percent to over 2 million acres, reflecting tight world supplies. Prices are predicted to aver- age over a dollar more than last year's loan rate of .27 per hundredweight. Plantings will increase in 1973. Soybeans and Oil Seeds. Farmers in- tend to plant 49 million acres to soy- beans, up 5 percent from a year ago to meet expanding export demands. Pro- jections for 1973 indicate soybean prices will continue to soar, keeping soybeans as the nation's leading cash crop. Exports will rise some 60 million bushels to a record total of 475 mil- lion pounds. Cottonseed production will be up nearly a third and prices will run low- er this year. Flaxseed plantings will de- cline by 3 percent and prices will gain. Tobacco. The demand for tobacco products is on the rise. With larger basic quotas, farmers will likely harvest more tobacco so cash receipts should gain. Price support levels for eligible to- baccos will be up 5.3 percent over last year levels. Wheat A 6 percent yield increase in the winter wheat crop is indicated, and spring wheat plantings will likely be 15 percent above a year ago. The total 1973 wheat crop is predicted to be moderately above the 1,618 million bushel record of 1971. Prospects are good for record exports, too. Hence, high prices will ease some but will probably average 40 to 50 cents over the .25 per bushel loan rate. Fruits. The production of citrus fruit is expected to reach 13.6 million tons, a 12 percent increase over last year's record harvest. Reflecting a poor de- ciduous fruit harvest, citrus prices are high relative to last year but are ex- pected to decline. Prices for deciduous fruits will remain generally firm with some gains. Vegetables and Potatoes. Both fresh and processed vegetable production will be adequate so prices for nearly all items will continue generally favorable. Potato planting intentions are 2 per- cent larger, but grower prices will tend to remain firm. Each year forecasters are certain the outlook will bring more than usual un- certainty. The unfolding market trends of 1973 could make the claim valid. 23 Heading to Route 76 That's the plan used by this chapter to get citizens involved in community improvement. By Jack Pitzer ROUTE IT all started with a letter and a goal. The letter invited community lead- ers in Winterset, Iowa, to a meeting hosted by the FFA chapter. Their goal was part of their BOAC project. The FFA wanted to improve their community's appearance, create employment for youth of the commun- ity, and renew efforts of natural re- source conservation. The FFA chapter, however, wanted to be the "spark plug" to ignite all citi- zens into action. For a theme, the FFA developed "Route 76." The red, white, and blue symbol for their community-county campaign took the shape of a route sign to represent moving forward. The '76 represented 1976, America's Bicenten- nial year, and terminal year for their project. They placed the symbols around the community as a reminder of the task ahead. The FFA members developed a slide presentation to describe the im- provement needs of the town of Win- terset and surrounding Madison County. It also showed good things. Major areas they found needing attention were soil So far Winterset member Roy Foley has torn down and cleaned up 1 1 buildings. i\ < -^fc ^L^-t— .i^-^ and water erosion, dead elm trees from Dutch Elm disease which hit the county in the last five years, old buildings and sheds which weren't being used, and face lifting of the business districts. To get complete community in- volvement, the FFA chapter mailed their letter to folks in the area. Eight businesses contributed enough money to buy two advertisements in local papers. These ads invited all citizens to help, "What work do you have?" "What will you clean up?" "Do you approve of the project?" "What will you plant?" The Winterset Chapter has used their slides to stimulate civic group interest, such as Rotary, Senior Citizens, and Kiwanis. The County Farm Bureau pro- moted the project in their newspaper. A special cooperative project was a tree sale by the Lions Club. They sold 50 balled in burlap, 8 - 10 feet tall trees to citizens and the park. FFA mem- bers planted the trees as a service. The Madison County Board of Health asked the chapter to clean up an old filling station area five miles south of Winterset. Four old buildings were cleaned up, several dead trees were burned, five old junk cars were removed to an area for disposal, and three wagon loads of junk were picked up and hauled off. The chapter planted 230 autumil olive shrubs at Cedar Lake Park in co- operation with the Soil Conservation Service and the Soil Conservation Dis- trict. The Conservation District and the chapter also cooperated in the pur- chase of 100 scotch pine seedlings to be given to the Junior Garden Club members in the area. This was an at- tempt to call attention to the 100th an- niversary of Arbor Day. Further, the garden clubs purchased a Bradford pear tree which was set out on the grounds of the new low rent housing development. The district conservation- ist gave a demonstration on how to plant the tree. The mayor and the city council of Winterset have launched a campaign FFA A PURPOSE This symbol represents a commitment. to clean up the old junk cars in Winter- set. They estimated there were at least 100 of them. To date about 40 have been removed. The County Board of Health is launching a campaign to have owners clean up and fix up rental properties in the county. If they are not fixed up to the satisfaction of the Board of Health they are to be destroyed. FFA members and others have re- ported that 50 old buildings have been cleaned up or disposed of so far. Each week new reports are coming in to the Winterset FFA Chapter about more clean up. The chapter has been con- tacted to tear down a double corn crib, two barns, and another building later on in the spring or during the summer. Re- cently five FFA members took down an old grainery. The owner paid them .00 for the job. Sixty-two members of the chapter reported cleaning up 85 projects last year. These ranged from cutting trees, to tearing down buildings, and the re- moval of junk from their farmsteads. Guiding the long-range "Route 76" project is Advisor John Bishop. 24 MW/NE/S 'Tex here! Found stray." The National FUTURE FARMER BACK THEN PLOWING WAS THE ONLY WAX Years ago when your dad started farming, No-Tillage farming was no more than a myth. Sure, the idea of "chemical tillage" was a theory, but the chemicals to make it work didn't exist. Then along came Paraquat, a super-effective, non- selective contact herbicide and No-Tillage farming was suddenly a practical reality. In simplest terms, No-Till substitutes the use of sophisticated herbicides for most or all mechanical tillage operations. In the words of one agronomist, "The contact herbicide substitutes for the plow and disc while the residual chemical performs the function of the cultivator." With No-Till corn, for example, you plant directly into the trash, sod or stubble of a preceding crop. It's a once-over operation in which you spray a mixture of Paraquat and atrazine, open a seedbed with a notched or fluted coulter, plant your seed and close the seedbed in what is essentially one trip across the field. Sure, it sounds like a wild idea, but it works. And No -Tillage farming produces yields equal or greater than with conventional methods. But the big reason for switching to the new method is the spectacular economies a farmer can achieve. Labor costs drop, equipment costs drop, soil erosion is greatly decreased. Of great importance, since No -Tillage means minimum soil disturbance, it means that a lot of previously unfarmable hilly land can be put into crop production. In a few words, No-Tillage farming is here to stay. Already there are some 20 million acres devoted to this technique and that amount could easily quadruple in the next few years. By the time you're in business for yourself. No -Tillage may well be the conventional method of farming. If you'd like to know more about it now, ORTHO has prepared a great deal of literature on the subject. It's called ORTHO-TIL Farming Systems Using Paraquat. We'll mail you this litera- ture free. Just send a postcard with your name and address to Chevron Chemical Company, ORTHO Division, Dept. 0-T, 200 Bush Street, San Francisco, CA 94120. „_ Chevron Chemical Company WHY PUT YOUR FKSHER THROUGH THIS? Maybe you think it's the only way. You just don't have the money for a college education. And you don't have the credit to get a loan on your own either. There's a way out for you, and a way out of the poorhouse for your dad. Enroll in Air Force ROTC. You may be eligible for one of their 6,500 scholarships if qualified for flight training. The scholarships with fringe benefits— like tu- ition, lab fees, incidental fees, and a textbook allow- ance. Not to mention a monthly allowance of 0 tax-free, and free flying lessons. Find out how you can enroll in Air Force ROTC by contacting the Air Force ROTC representative on a col- lege campus, or by calling 800-447-4700 toll free, or by sending in the coupon. Get a college education, a monthly allowance, and free flying lessons. Keep dear ol' dad from hocking the family jewels. Air Force ROTC 2-N Box A Randolph AFB, Texas 78148 Please send me more information on Air Force ROTC. I am interested in your scholarship program. My first three choices of colleges offering Air Force ROTC are; 1 ? ^ NarfiA Addr(ss (Please Print) nty dfafo 7ip natp nf nrarliiatinn Soc. Sec. s Agp .9px •In Illinois call 800-322-4400. FIND YOURSELFA SCHOLARSHIP IN AIR FORCE ROTC. 26 The National FUTURE FARMER ALABAMA Alabama State University. Montgomery 36101 Auburn Unpuersity, Auburn 36830 Uniuersity of Alabama, University 35488 Livingston University, Livingston 35470 Samford University. Birmingham 35209 Tuskegee Institute, Tuskegee 360S8 Troy State University, Troy 36081 ARIZONA University of Arizona. Tucson 85721 Arizona State University, Tempe 85281 Nortfiern Arizona University, Flagstaff 86001 University of Arkansas at Fayetteville, Fayetteville 72701 University of Arkansas at f^onticello. fvlonticello 71655 CALIFORNIA California State University, Fresno 93710 California State University, San Jose 95114 California Institute of Technology, Pasadena 91109 California State University, San Diego 92115 California State University. San Francisco 94132 Loyola University of Los Angeles. Los Angeles 90045 University of California, Los Angeles. Los Angeles 90024 University of Southern California. Los Angeles 90007 University of California, Berkeley 94720 COLORADO Colorado State University, Fort Collins 80521 University of Northern Colorado, Greeley 80631 University of Colorado, Boulder 80302 CONNECTICUT University of Connecticut, Storrs 06268 DISTRICT OF COLUIUIBIA Georgetown University, Washington 20007 Howard University, Washington 20001 The Catholic University of America, Washington 20017 FLORIDA Embry Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytuna Beach 32015 Florida Technological University. Orlando 32816 The Florida Slate University. Tallahassee 32306 University of Florida. Gainesville 32601 University of Miami, P.O. Box 8164, Coral Gables 33124 GEORGIA The University of Georgia, Athens 30601 Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta 30332 Emory University, Atlanta 30333 Valdosta State College, Valdosta, 31601 HAWAII 96322 IDAHO University of Idaho, Moscow 83843 ILLINOIS Bradley University, Peoria 61606 Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago 60616 University of Illinois, Urbana 61801 Edwards' , Edwards' 46208 irks College, Cahokia 62206 INDIANA sity, Indianapolis rsity, Bloomington 47401 Purdue University, Lafayette 47906 University of Not'e Dame. Notre Dame 46556 University of Evansville. Evansville 47701 IOWA Coe College. Cedar Rapids 52402 Iowa State University. Ames 50010 University of Iowa. Iowa City 52240 Drake University. Des Moines 50311 Parsons College. Fairfield 52556 University of Kansas, Lawrence 66044 Washburn University. Topeka 66621 KENTUCKY University of Kentucky. Lexington 40506 University of Louisville. Louisville 40208 LOUISIANA Grambling College. Grambling 71245 Louisiana Tech University. Ruston 71270 Louisiana State University & A&M College. Baton Rouge 70803 Nicholls State University. Thibodaux 70301 University of Southwestern Louisiana. Lafayette 70501 Tulane University. New Orleans 70118 MARYLAND University of Maryland. College Park 20742 University of Maryland. Eastern Shore 21853 01610 Lowell Technological Institute. Lowell 01854 Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Cambridge 02139 University of Massachusetts. Amherst 01002 MICHIGAN Michigan State University. East Lansing 48823 University of Detroit. Detroit 48221 The University of Michigan. Ann Arbor 48104 Michigan Technological University, Houghton 49931 MINNESOTA St. Olaf College, Northfield 55057 College of St. Thomas, St. Paul 55105 University of Minnesota. Minneapolis 55455 University of Minnesota at Duluth. Duluth 55812 College 39762 University of Mississippi, University 38677 Mississippi Valley State College, Itta Bena 38941 University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg 39401 MISSOURI Saint Louis University, St. Louis 63108 Southeast Missouri State College. Cape Girardeau 63701 University of Missouri. Columbia 65201 University of Missouri at Rolla. Rolla 65401 MONTANA Montana State University. Bozeman 59715 University of Montana. Missoula 59801 NEBRASKA University of Nebraska, Lincoln 68508 The University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha 68101 NEW HAMPSHIRE KANSAS Kansas State Uni 66506 Wichita State Univer! 67208 April-May 1973 sity, Manhattan sity, Wichita NEW JERSEY Rutgers, The State University. New Brunswick 08903 Newark College of Engineering, Newark 07102 Stevens Inst tute of Technology. Hoboken 07030 NEW MEXICO New Mexico State University. Las Cruces 88001 College of Santa Fe. Santa Fe 87501 University of New Mexico. Albuquerque 87106 NEW YORK Cornell University. Ithaca 14850 Fordham University. Bronx 10458 Syracuse University. Syracuse 13210 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Troy 12181 Manhattan College. Bronx 10471 Fayetteville State Univ Fayetteville 28301 University of North Carolina. Chapel Hill 27515 North Carolina State University at Raleigh. Raleigh 27607 East Carolina University. Greenville 27834 North Carolina A&T Slate University. Greensboro 27405 NORTH DAKOTA North Dakota State University of A&AS. Fargo 58102 University of North Dakota. Grand Forks 58202 OHIO Bowling Green State University. Bowling Green 43403 Kent State University, Kent 44240 Miami University. Oxford 45056 The Ohio State University. Columbus 43210 Capital University. Columbus 43209 Ohio University. Athens 45701 Ohio Wesleyan University. Delaware 43015 Denison University. Granville 43023 Otterbein College. Westerville 43081 The University of Akron. Akron 44325 University of Cincinnati. Cincinnati 45221 OKLAHOMA Oklahoma State University. Stillwater 74074 The University of Oklahoma. Norman 73069 University of Tulsa. Tulsa 74104 OREGON Oregon State University. Corvallls 97331 University of Oregon. Eugene 97403 University of Portland. Portland 97203 Willamette University, Salem 97301 PENNSYLVANIA St. Joseph's College, Philadelphia 19131 Duquesne University, Pittsburgh 15219 Lehigh University, Bethlehem 18015 The Pennsylvania State University. University Park 16802 University of Pittsburgh. Pittsburgh 15213 Allegheny College. Meadville 16335 Grove City College. Grove City 16127 Wilkes College. Wilkes-Barre 18703 Gettysburg College. Gettysburg I'UERTO RICO College of Agriculture & Mechanical Arts (UPR). Mayaquez 00708 University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras 00931 SOUTH CAROLINA Baptist College of Charleston. Charleston 29411 The Citadel. Charleston 29409 Clemson University. Clemson 29631 University of South Carolina. Columbia 29208 Newberry College. Newberry 29108 SOUTH DAKOTA South Dakota State University Brookings 57006 38152 ennessee State University. Nashville 37203 Inlversity of Tennessee. Knoxv 37916 Iniversity of the South. Swanc 37375 Station 77840 Baylor University, Waco 76706 Southern Methodist University, Dallas 75222 Texas Tech University, Lubbock 79406 The University of Texas, Austin 78712 East Texas State University, Commerce 75428 North Texas State University, Denton 76203 Southwest Texas State University. San Marcos 78666 Texas Christian University. Fort Worth 76129 Angelo State University. San Angelo 79601 Sul Ross State University, Alpine 79830 UTAH Brigham Young University, Provo 84601 Utah State University, Logan 84321 Southern Utah State College, Cedar City 84720 University of Utah, Salt Lake City 84112 VERMONT St. Michael's College, WInooski 05404 Norwich University. Northfield 05663 VIRGINIA Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg 24060 Virginia Military Institute, Lexington 24450 University of Virginia, Charlottesville 22903 98416 Washington State University, Pullman 99163 University of Washington, Seattle 98195 Central Washington State College, Ellensburg 98926 WEST VIRGINIA Davis & Elkins College, Elkins 26241 West Virginia University. Morgantown 26506 53706 University of Wisconsin at Superior, Superior 54880 WYOMING University of Wyoming, Box 3005, University Station. Laramie 82070 FFA EXPLORERS {Continued from Page 20) The guests helped with farm work and chores as time allowed. Guests and hosts traveled by bus to tour a lawn seed and equipment com- pany in a nearby town. This tour and refreshments were hosted by a third chapter — Marysville, Ohio. The next day the visitors were given an air tour of Ohio. A swimming party for the two FFA chapters plus Big Walnut FHA was a fun time. The exchange between Crosby, Texas, and Clinchport, Virginia, of two stu- dents for one week in each town in- cluded taking the guests to the host's state convention. The other half of the Charles City, Iowa, and Milton-Freewater, Oregon, exchange described earlier was full of activities, too. Iowa guests lived and worked on Oregon members' farms. Special tours were arranged for farms with wheat and peas and a pea cannery. "Traveling that far," reports Randy Heitz of Charles City, "we went through lands which some of us had never seen before and so we'll long remember the trip." The Iowa delegation got to the ocean and even tried their hand at dig- ging clams. Benefits of Exchanges Potentials for chapter-to-chapter ex- changes are great. The experiences gained from agricultural and geograph- ical differences are most obvious. A good "swap" can broaden ag career outlooks of chapter members. Chapters can share plenty of ideas about fund raising, banquet programs, exhibits, reg- ular meeting features, how to speak, how to get more member involvement, how to involve an alumni chapter, and how to promote FFA and vo-ag. And the exchange can be a solid basis for new friendships and even some recreation and sightseeing. Mark Harris an<J Greg Leaf board the plane for an air tour of Ohio farms. EXPERIENCE IN PRODUCTION UNITES YOUTH WITH OPPORTUNITIES ment. In addition, they use an 18- x 35-foot greenhouse which contains a growing area, two nurseries, and several beds of cutting flowers. One instructor oversees the entire horticulture program. MEMBERS of the Earl C. Baity FFA at Pylesville, Maryland, receive occupational experiences at the North Harford High School on a year-round basis. Besides working in inachine shop and greenhouse facilities, members have the opportunity of using school owned land for crop and live- stock management. Members working with crops and livestock utilize 37 acres owned by the North Harford School Board in addi- tion to operating 53 acres of rented land. They farm 63 acres in crops, 10 acres as permanent pasture, and 17 acres as pond, forestry, and horticul- ture areas. Typically, the crop acres are devoted to mostly corn and alfalfa, with some barley. The livestock herd includes An- gus calves, yearlings, 20 cows, and a bull, for a total of 45 head on hand in the winter. Two groups of 60 hogs and 15 steers are marketed each year. Vocational agriculture students con- centrate on management of the farm rather than operation — although they assist during peak work periods. The farm provides the opportunity to learn about fencing, building, painting, and Nor+h Harford members use the ma- chinery to practice management skills. concrete work, plus livestock, crop, and soil management. For the most part crops are planted, tended, and harvested by a hired man who devotes most of his time to the farm. Overall management of the farm, or "land laboratory" as the members refer to it, is supervised by one of the three agricultural teachers at the school. '?# ^ 1 ! i ■---# 1 ' "■ J', ^m C y HF'JI The machine shop serves as "link" be- tween students in all production areas. Except for custom harvesting of the barley, a full line of machinery is used to operate the farm. As a result, North Harford agriculture students learn to adjust and repair farm equipment. The agricultural mechanics shop is well equipped for tractor and machinery repair, as well as woodworking and metal work. Among the equipment are: drill presses, a steam cleaner, tractor dynamometer, 1 1 welders, metal and wood cutting band saws, a 12-inch ta- ble saw, and an 8-inch jointer. Approxi- mately 250 vocational agriculture stu- dents benefit from these shop facilities as all three teachers share in these re- sponsibilities. In ornamental horticulture the FFA members manage a turf demonstration plot. They learn to use tillers, tractors, and other outdoor horticulture equip- North Harford horticulturists get a chance to work with flowers and turf. Membership in the Earl C. Baity Chapter numbers 83. Each of the nine agriculture classes has a slate of offi- cers, which along with regular chapter officers, make up the FFA executive committee. The FFA chapter and the executive committee each meet monthly during the school day. Although all three instructors assist with the FFA program, one instructor's primary re- sponsibility is advising the FFA chapter. The main advantage of the North Harford occupational experience pro- gram at the school has been the in- creased experience in a number of ag- riculture educational areas. Previously, many students were limited in the op- portunities to learn agricultural skills since most home farm operations did not include all of the skill areas. An appraisal of the North Harford program is revealed in these facts. Over a four-year period 23 percent of the graduates entered college or took advanced training, 40 percent obtained agricultural jobs immediately after high school, 23 percent were using their skills on farms, and only 14 percent were working outside of agriculture. Each year approximately 15 students gradu- ate from the North Harford agricul- tural and mechanics program, and 10 students graduate from ornamental hor- ticulture. (By Elmer Cooper, Advisor) This is the second in a series of "Unites Youth With Opportunities" articles. The series will tell how various FFA and vo- cational agribusiness programs are provid- ing youth with the opportunity for experi- ences in many different areas of agribusi- ness. Upcoming articles will describe how advisors are using cooperatives, leadership activities, and occupational experiences to prepare students for a life in agriculture. The National FUTURE FARMER Doing "Rat Chores" This science project really "multiplied" on him. By Willard and Elma Waltner CRAIG Hansen, a member of the Viborg, South Dakota, FFA Chapter, is busily involved in many school and extracurricular ac- tivities. His swine enterprise, and the evening milking of his dad's 30 to 40 cows also keep him on the go. And then there are his "rat chores" — an experiment that began as a school Science Fair project when he set out to determine the effect of alcohol on rats. Craig began his test with eight rats in three pens. Two pregnant females served as his "control group," receiv- ing the same rations as the others, but no alcohol. This group thrived as heal- thy rats should. Craig supplied the other rats a vodka mixed with their favorite food, bread and sour milk. One female and two males got a small, but constant amount of alcohol each day of the experiment period. Craig furnished the other pen of one female and two males an increas- ing daily amount of alcohol. The "social drinkers," receivers of the minimal amount of alcohol, dis- played little health effect, but the "al- coholic rats" soon showed a visual re- sult. Their eyes bulged and their hair Many at Mini-Meet Once there they found leadership opportunity. MEMBERS of FFA chapters within a 150-mile radius of Quincy, Illi- nois, were invited to a Mini-Leader- ship Conference. About 300 attended the conference conducted by the six national FFA officers. Members from The national officers formed a recep- tion line for meet ng partic i pants. ■ n ■ ^^H ■■1 S' 1 m I ^ J 11 1 1 1 Jmt ? / J-^ I ^f ^H ^^h L^M i^ 1 IK SIh Tne discussion groups got everyone in- volved in the many leadership topics. Missouri and Iowa as well as Illinois participated in the conference. The national officers began the meet- ing by greeting chapter members as they arrived shortly after 10 a.m. The con- ference included a "brainstorming" ses- sion, with members divided into 14 groups. Each group was given a sub- ject and asked to develop ideas on it. Group chairmen met later and made final summaries. Moorman Manufacturing Company hosted the meeting at their Sales Edu- cation Center and lunch in the com- pany cafeteria. The national officers began the day by filming telecasts and eating breakfast with members of the Moorman Advi- sory Board. Craig became "attached to his rat pro- ject," especially the control mothers. got rough and coarse. In general they sat around in a stupor or teetered around drunkenly when they stumbled over for their "swig." The offspring of the alcoholic moth- ers "did not seem to grow at all," ac- cording to Craig. They sickened and died one after another — miserable, de- hydrated specimens. But the real damage showed up when Craig and the veterinarian dissected the rats at the conclusion of the two- month experiment. The liver of the al- coholic rats was badly deteriorated and in a few more days would have "ex- ploded," in the animal doctor's opinion. They had stomach ulcers, an extremely enlarged colon, little body fat, and pneumonia on their discolored lungs. The control rats, on the other hand, showed "a nice fat inside with every- thing in order." Craig's experiment won first place in his division at the school Science Fair, second in the regional fair, and num- erous other awards. But it also gave Craig a personal impression. "Seeing the effect of alcohol on rats has con- vinced me that I want no part of al- cohol in my life," he says. Craig's first place display featured a journal with his daily observations. Waltner Photos /^ucoHoyc R April-May 1973 MW/NE/S 29 Over600 people attended the banquet in honor of theMontrose advisor. A LASTING TRIBUTE Members of this chapter used their large banquet to pay tribute to their advisor. The painting portrays many of the things this vocational agriculture teacher means to them. THE feelings FFA members have for their advisor are often hard to convey. As their trusted friend, counselor, and instructor, he means more than words or trophies can express. This is especially true of members at Montrose, Colorado, in their admiration for Advisor DeVon Clark, the local instructor of agricul- ture for 29 years. But the Montrose members found a way to put their feelings across when they presented Advisor Clark with a painted portrait of himself. Outgoing Montrose President Ted Jones made the presentation on behalf of the classes of 1972 through 1975 at the chapter's 25th banquet last year. The portrait reveals Advisor Clark with a western hat as he is fondly vis- ualized by present and past members. Looking further one can see illustrated many FFA activities led by Advisor Clark — including the annual chapter wilderness camping trip (featured in "A Trek into the Wilderness" of the June-July 1971 issue), ranch visits to check members' crops or livestock, trips to meetings or livestock shows, and many of the other activities performed by an advisor in leading a chapter. "In selecting an artist we feel for- tunate to have secured the services of Mr. Terrence Clark of San Angelo, Texas, the famed western artist who did a similar portrait of Will Rogers," says past President Jones. Until the painter was introduced at the banquet, to the surprise of Advisor Clark and the audience, he had never met the agri- culture instructor. However, members had provided the artist with access to over 50 photographs of their advisor 30 to create the 24- x 36-inch likeness which was paid for by the members. Advisor Clark's success over the years is emphatically illustrated in the attend- ance of over 600 at the banquet and the remainder of the program. The Montrose function, like most parent and son banquets, features the presentation of degrees to Greenhands and Chapter Farmers, awards to proficiency winners and honorary members, and the an- nouncing of new chapter officers. But they add the fanfare, too. For openers they serve a complete steak dinner, host a senator, congressman, or past national FFA officer as the main speaker, honor a chapter mother, and elect a chapter sweetheart. Yet the most spectacular part of the program is the finale — one of four dif- ferent pageants designed by the FFA members. Each program includes a ti- tle theme, narration, high school band accompaniment, and an FFA chorus. Last year's pageant, also presented at the Colorado FFA Convention, was en- titled "Assembly of the Emblem." It featured a 20-foot color lighted FFA emblem and six high school girls pos- ing as statuettes. At scheduled times during the narration the girls, dressed in gold swim suits and covered with gold makeup, appear representing the following: Religion (Cross); New Era in Agriculture (Rising Sun); Freedom (Liberty Flame); Knowledge (Book); Production (Sheath of Grain); and the History of Corn (Indian Girl). And behind all this member involve- ment is an advisor they "love and ap- preciate" as mentioned on their por- trait. "Dee in essence lets the mem- bers plan their own programs, set up chapter rules, and discipline them- selves," says National FFA Executive Secretary William Paul Gray, a form- er Colorado vo-ag teacher and long- time friend of Advisor Clark. "Through him members really gain the feeling of responsible citizenship. Serving as a critic teacher for agricultural educa- tion students studying at Colorado State University, Dee 'instilled them with the desire to teach.' " Advisor Clark admits receiving the color portrait was the greatest thing that ever happened to him and that he almost lost his composure at the time. Yet another lasting tribute was made to Advisor DeVon Clark at the 1972 National FFA Convention when he was presented the Honorary American Farmer degree. Advisor Clark watches as Ted Jones honors Mr.TerrenceClarlcwitha plaque. Ben Walker Photos The National FUTURE FARMER April-May 1973 31 Small Fish, ig Rare as it may seem, this FFA'er sells tropical fish to every part of the U.S. OST pool raised fish in the United States are grown by producers within a 20-mile radius of Tampa, Florida. In fact, tropical fish make up the largest single item of air freight being shipped out of Florida. One such producer of tropical fish is Rudy Wetherington, the Florida FFA Association president. He lives about 20 miles east of Tampa and farms 188 pools in partnership with his dad on a 23-acre fish farm near Dover. Several years ago Rudy's dad, upon returning to his native Hills- borough County, began what he and Rudy have developed into one of the largest tropical fish farms in America. As a freshman Rudy managed two pools, grossing almost ,000 and selling over 10,000 from each pool. He then switched his concentration from beef cattle, although he maintains a 20-head mixed breed herd and registered Angus bull. The next year he operated 15 pools and has since increased his share of the partnership to 40 pools. He annu- ally raises more than a million tropical fish — including swordtails, black mollies, and platties. Rudy usually stocks a pool with 200 to 500 breeder fish, depending on the variety. Female fish can produce thou- sands of offspring three to four times yearly and create a population problem. For this reason Rudy must constantly trap and grade them to eliminate off colored and undesirable sizes of fish. "A pool receiving intensive care will yield anywhere from zero to over 10,000 fish per year depending on disease and weather," says Rudy, a winner of the area Fish and Wildlife Management Proficiency award. "A closely graded group of tropical fish are bringing about .00 per thousand." All of the fish on the Wetherington farm are fed six days a week, except on days before trapping. Fish food currently costs them approximately .00 per hundred pounds, and Here Rudy explains sizing and color variafion in dif- ferent breeds being held for conditioning in aquariums. Handling traps requires extra care. Rudy sets a plas- tic one in the black-molly pool located in front of him. they daily feed around 300 pounds. Rudy, a former secre- tary and president of the Turkey Creek Chapter, fertilizes his pools about three times a year to promote plankton growth for the fish to eat. According to Rudy it requires approximately 0 to construct a pool 20- x 65-feet in size. It takes another 0 to install a water supply for the fish. Each pool needs to be pumped, washed, cleaned, and filled with water from a deep-well at least once a year. Rudy catches his fish in two types of traps, plastic and wire. The fish farmer then grades the fish according to breed, color, size, condition, and sex and places them into aquar- iums. The fish are held there for 24 to 48 hours to receive medication and be conditioned for shipping. Finally Rudy puts the fish in polyethylene bags filled one-quarter full with water and medication and the rest with oxygen before tying the top with a heavy duty rubber band. Rudy puts the bags of fish in styrofoam boxes which are packaged in standard cardboard fish boxes. All of the tropical fish raised by the Wetherington's are sold in large quantities to a national distributor. Rudy's fish are shipped throughout the United States to pet shops and variety stores to be enjoyed in homes, offices, and churches. Besides being an extremely skilled fish farmer, Rudy has been an active FFA officer. "Rudy has shown outstanding dedication in the FFA and is one of the hardest working students I've ever had," points out Advisor Oscar Lastsinger. Rudy is a member of the National Honor Society, Who's Who Among American High School Students, and the Soci- ety of Outstanding American High School Students. Rudy returns fish too small for marketing to pools as he grades saleable fish. Both types of traps are shown. 32 MW/NE The National FUTURE FARMER A Tour of Rural Life It eave children a chance to see a world unknown to them. SOME 1,650 kindergarten pupils from 38 schools in Allen County, Indi- ana, got their first look at farm life on a rural field trip. The kindergarteners, with the help of FFA members from six chapters in the Fort Wayne area, vis- ited a farm and received a lecture tour of the place. Indiana FFA President Al Neidlinger was on hand for the tour festivities. WKJG-TV Photos '-' IS- The rural field trip was organized by Mr. Wayne Rothgeb, farm director at WKJG-TV, and FFA chapters at Carroll, Heritage, Churubusco, Colum- bia City, Woodlan, and Huntington High Schools. FFA members furnished the farm animals plus assisting with the building of pens. A wildlife biologist provided a station featuring his dog, and a forester set up a stop near a forest. The tours were conducted for almost two days on a farm owned by Mrs. Fred Kraft. A large tag containing the first name was pinned to the child's clothing so FFA members stationed at the various tour stops could answer questions with a "personal touch." Each stop consisted of a lecture, question and answer session, and time for the children to touch, pet, or hold the animal or machine. The children were brought in contact with cows, goats, ponies, pigs, chickens, rabbits, sheep, grains, milking machines, and farm machinery. They even hiked The children got the "feel" of how a milking machine operates at this stop. through a forest and got a close-up view of some wild animals (stuffed and live). The impressions of the rural tour varied greatly. One girl listened to the lecture about hogs with her hands held over her nose and mouth. Still other youngsters turned up their noses after hearing yolks are "chicks that aren't alive." But the children, as one lecturer reports "got a chance to get outside of four walls and explore farm life." Farming... it's our future too! We've been around the farm scene for a long time. Since 1914, our products have helped your dad and grandad raise strong, healthy livestock, and we're determined to help you do the same. That's why we're constantly working to "GEAR UP" our salt and mineral products to meet the latest nutritional requirements of today's breeds. No matter what class of livestock you raise, Hardy's full line of agricultural products offers special formulations to help improve production. So— we're as committed to farming as you are. Send in the coupon today for a FREE full color book called "Minerals for Dairy & Beef" (please enclose 25jzf for postage and handling). Find out all about the trace mineral and mineral functions, interactions and requirements for growth. Hardy Salt Company P.O. Drawer 449 St. Louis, Missouri 63166 T — \ — r Hardy offers Trace Mineral Salt, Foot Rot Salt, Super Trace Swine Salt and Fly'n Worm Mineral Medicated. Please send me the FREE full color bool^let on "Minerals for Dairy 4 Beef" (25fi enclosed for mailing and handling) My llvestocl< interests are: n Dairy D Beef □ Sheep □ Swine NAME ADDRESS CITY STATE ZIP April-May 1973 MW4 33 They Can Split A Second Why can't you hit a flying target like the experts or hit a speeding ball like the stars? Here's why! By Irwin Ross, Ph. D. HOW does the expert skeetshooter do it — 25 straight hits on a windy day as the birds streak a mile-a-minute through the air like com- ets, while you miss more than you hit? How does a Rosewall or a Laver leap across ten feet of space in a fast tennis match, put a racket in front of a can- nonading ball at just the right angle so it glides back into the corner of the court where the opponent isn't? An ace pitcher winds up and lays his fast one in, so it seems no more than a flash of white to you. Yet a Kaline or an Aaron is able to drive it back with ease for a solid base hit. A jet pilot shoots down three enemy planes so fast two of them fall through the air at once. Still he returns to his base without a scratch. How come? The answer is simple. To the skeet expert, the targets look as big as dishpans. A Rosewall or Laver has no trouble following a zipping ball. To a Kaline or Aaron, those pitches float up to them looking as big as pump- kins. And the jet pilot actually finds the enemy plane isn't moving that fast. Why? Because they "split the second" into a thousand parts! The super-athlete can literally slow objects to a standstill. He has the co- ordination that the non-expert can't imagine and the watch can't record. This "second-splitting" enables him to feel there is plenty of time to do what seems incredible to the less gifted and less highly trained. A good shot does not throw his gun barrel in the general direction of what he wants to hit and pull the trigger. He aims. As the good shooter's eye be- comes trained, the moving object to be hit "seems" to slow down and "seems" to grow larger. The man be- hind the gun begins to have the illusion 34 it is not necessary to hurry, and hitting what he wants to shoot is so extremely easy it becomes almost ridiculous. Eyesight, plus infinitely rapid muscu- lar reaction, is the story back of the great hitters in baseball. The wonderful eyes "slow" and "stop" the best fast balls and the trickiest curves. Most of the hitters don't actually see the ball when they hit it, though a few claim they follow the ball clear up to the spot where the bat smacks it. Rogers Horns- by used to insist a batter ought to hit every ball he swung at, though he, of course, was unable to carry the theory out 1,000 percent. Timing is virtually the whole story in hitting a baseball, requiring the cor- rect working together of eyesight and muscular reaction. The eyes transmit a vision of the projected course of a fly- ing ball, and the muscles then, almost instinctively, adjust themselves to bring the bat around at the infinitesimal point to meet the ball. Because of the delicacy of this physi- ological adjustment, which is possibly more complex than the mechanism of our space rockets, ballplayers are ex- tremely careful about both their eyes and their muscles. Many of them will not read much — especially on a train or bus. They are also very careful about doing work that might disturb the mus- cular makeup needed for hitting. In tennis when you are "hot," when your eye is "in," the hardest-hit drive looks three times as big as usual. At the crucial moment before you sock it, you have the illusion the ball was hang- ing there simply waiting to be put away. Why can the top prize fighters pick off their foes' punches with the sim- plest of defensive blocks, and land lightning blows of their own at the very second the less skilled foe leaves his chin exposed? For the very same reason. Though the answer is simple, the ability is hard. It takes natural ability, trained eyes, and physical practice to "split seconds." What happens when a good hunter starts to miss his game, when the boxer is off in his timing, when the batting star starts to strike out, when the ten- nis player loses his timing? Nothing has happened except they have lost their "eye." The ability to slow down moving objects with trained eyes has suddenly deserted these worthy athletes, and for a time they are seeing things as ordinary mortals see them. Whatever the cause — emotional, psy- chological — it isn't the muscles that fail, but their eyes. They have lost their power to "split the second." "Well, there goes my old record and my old shorts!" The National FUTURE FARMER I a„4.,„,ii„„i„g,«i,. I^min j ^ton S ports Nylon 66, The gun with nine hves. J And then some. Nylon 66 MB It's said that cats have nine lives, because of their remarkable ability to survive catas- trophe. Our Nylon 66 automatic rifle has that same abiHty. And it has at least six more lives, to boot. Here's the story: At our Research Center in Ilion, New York, Rem- ington engineers fired 75,000 rounds from a single Nylon 66 22 caliber, automatic rim fire rifle. At the end of the test, there had been no malfunctions and the gun remained in good firing condition. Now, if you figure that the average number of rounds fired in a gun in a lifetime is approximately 5,000 rounds— and that's on the high side— then that Nylon 66 had been fired for the equivalent of fifteen lifetimes. Actually I though, one life- time of excep- tionally reliable use is enough for most of us. And that's the very ^^^^^ iisji^™. ■»- least you'll get jK^^^K^^Si^S^Ki.Sit.^ t^-a from the Nylon 66. ( We designed it to take an incredible amount of abuse. It performs '^^ beautifully in Remington engineer test hring the any weather. Nylon 66. And it's as free of malfunction as a gan can be. We know of one story, for example, where a Nylon 66 was burned in a fire. After the soot and dust were cleaned from it, the gun was fired. It worked. And that's not surprising, because in tests ve've shot the Nylon 66 at a scorching 250° F. We've frozen it and fired it at minus 40°F. We've soaked it in water. Covered it with dust. Buried Fit in mud. And each time, our Nylon 66 came out shooting. If you can find a better 22 than that, buy it. What gives this gun its remarkable dura- bility? It's the exclusive Remington design incorporating a super-tough structural nylon -Du Pont ZYTEL®-as the material for the fore-end and stock. ZYTEL is so tough, in fact, that it's used to make everything from high-stress machinery gears to horse- shoes. In the Nylon 66, it makes a stock that will not warp, crack, chip, peel or fade for the life of the gun. So you have an extremely rugged rifle that doesn't need babying. It can bounce around the back of a truck, lie in a dusty closet for months, slosh around in the bot- tom of a canoe or even sit outside your igloo day after day. And every time, when you're ready to use it, it's ready to fire. And when you fire your Nylon 66, you'll find it an exceptionally accurate gun. The same barrel-bedding principle used on the world's most expensive target rifles is used on the Nylon 66. The action never needs lubrication, either, be- '" •' cause the metal parts glide on "greaseless bearings" of nylon that resist dust, dirt and grit, a cause of malfunctions jn other automatics. Did you ever hear of Tom Frye? He was a ./'.-^ '..j. Remington Field Rep- ► _.-'' " resentative when the ■ ▼ ■ >^ f ^ A ^ V gun was first intro-vV/- , ' >/ ' ■ " ^ -\. duced in 1959, and he ^7- . j^ry^} ^\ ,^^^^ wanted to demonstrate ' v^. '_-^k .. . > j^ .^^.^ - its amazing performance and accuracy. So using two Nylon 66's in relays (and Peters 22 long rifle car- tridges), he had assistants toss 2%" wooden blocks as targets. Out of 100,010 targets tossed, Tom hit all but six— a record which stands to this day. There wasn't a single malfunction, and the guns finished in great shape. We think the Nylon 66 is the most rugged rifle you can buy. And for the money, one of the most accurate. It's available with either a brown stock and blued re- ceiver (Mohawk Brown model— .95), or a black stock with a chrome-plated receiver and barrel (Apache Black model-.95). Both are tube-fed and have a capacity of fourteen 22 caliber long rifle cartridges. And while you're at it, get yourself a supply of Remington high velocity 22s with "golden" bullets. They're coated with a special hard, dry lubricant that won't pick up dirt or lint to carry into the mechanism of the rifle. And they have "Kleanbore" priming so they won't leave residue to corrode the barrel. (This ammu- nition is designed and tested to work efficiently with the Nylon 66. So it makes sense that you should use it.) Remington Reports are based on facts documented by the specialists who design and make our prod- ucts. For more information, write for a copy of our latest catalog: Remington Arms Company, Inc., Dept. 142, Bridgeport, Conn. 06602. I^mington Great guns deserve great ammunition. We make both. 'Prices shown are suggested minimum prices. Subject to ctiange without notice. "Remington" and "Kleanbore" are trademarks registered in the US, Patent Office: "golden" is 3 trademark of the Remington Arms Company. Inc.: ■"Zytel" is a registered trademark of the Du Pont Co. for nylon resins. A]irH-Maij 1973 35 Allentown, New Jersey, historian dug up photos of students building the ag building in 1942. Published them in chapter newsletter. N-N.N FFA members of the McKenzie, Ala- bama, get mail through five different post office addresses. Eldridge, Iowa, FFA bought a re- frigerator to store sales merchandise like candy bars and milk. N-N-N Chapter level public speaking elim- ination contest for Burns, Wyoming, is at a school assembly. N-N-N Three Arizona chapters got together for Greenhand and Chapter Farmer initiation. Canyon de Chelly hosted Monument Valley and Window Rock. N-N-N Many, many chapters around the na- tion collected food for needy families like Winnfield, Louisiana, at Christmas. N-N-N At Beaumont, Texas, high school of 1,200, the FFA collected more for Teen March of Dimes than all other groups. Good work. N-N-N Middlebourne. West Virginia, Chap- ter has 10 percent of its members on honor society. Lemon Dotson, Mark Hickman, Paula Ash. N-N-N Members of Corona, California, brought their animals to a Saturday morning showmanship clinic. Training for new members, brush-up for the old. N-N-N Mason Valley, Nebraska, reports their annual Christmas tree haul. N-N-N Jan and Jay Runner are twins and Lynn and Leon Hunt are twins. They're all members of Northwestern, Sciota, Illinois, FFA. N-N-N White Salmon and Goldendale, Wash- ington, Chapters are in a basketball league with three Oregon chapters. Dal- les, Hood River Valley, and Sherman. 36 Pumpkins donated to hospital by Governor Mifflin, Pennsylvania, FFA were decorated by patients in one ward and given to kiddies ward. N-N-N Killingly, Connecticut, Chapter held a parliamentary procedure and leader- ship workshop for officers and advisors of other school organizations. N-N-N Each Monday a.m. Powell Valley, Speedwell, Tennessee, cleans up trash on school grounds. N-N-N What special training will you pro- vide for the officers who are elected to lead your chapter next year? N-N-N Another question. Was your chapter banquet a success? Was it something special? Did your parents like it? Was the food good? Let me know. N-N-N Ten seniors of Absarokee, Montana, and advisor drove to Denver Stock Show. N-N-N Moore, Oklahoma, sold sausage to townspeople. N-N-N Greenhands at Nashville, Arkansas, entertained members with solos and group songs, including "Hail To The FFA." N-N-N Marshfield, Missouri, members played teachers in a donkey game. N-N-N "We co-sponsored a snowmobile safe- ty class with adult farmer class and local businessmen." West Union, Iowa. N-N-N I What a game! Jefferson, Wisconsin, basketball team defeated a rival chap- ter by 108-14. N-N-N Bend, Oregon, has an innertubing party. I asked them, "What's that?" They replied, "We use inflated inner- tubes just like sleds on a hill covered with snow. Great fun!" N-N-N And so many chapters reported sell- ing citrus. I'm convinced it's a good project. Now tell us about all the other great activities. During FFA WEEK last year Stan- wood, Washington, Chapter supplied goodies for the school faculty. N-N-N New- chapter chartered at Montgom- ery County Joint Vocational School in Clayton, Ohio. N-N-N Pine Grove, Mississippi, bought used school bus. Fixed it up. Painted it blue and gold. N-N-N Menu of Mount Baker, Washington, FFA banquet featured barbecued salmon. N-N-N Bruce Mann, Lompoc, California, FFA'er won a 0 memorial scholar- ship, a 0 tool box, and 0 first prize in Lincoln arc welding contest. All for his ag mechanics skills. Norton, Kansas, Chapter raked lawns for elderly. But had to switch project to shoveling snow. N-N-N Two good ideas from Redfield, South Dakota. Showed slides of national con- vention for Greenhand installation and their parents. Then invited them to stay for lunch. N-N-N Juniors and seniors of Grayson, Ken- tucky, FFA built a new greenhouse. N-N-N The Dawson County, Georgia, Chap- ter started a calf chain for Greenhands. N-N-N Doug Thompson raised 47 wild tur- keys which the Cannon Falls, Minne- sota, Chapter released in the area. N-N-N Fifteen items of old farm equipment were reconditioned by Collins, Missis- sippi, FFA. Used by state for an exhibit. N-N-N I found 19 words in the John Bowne, New York, Chapter newsletter puzzle. This chapter is in New York City and anxious to visit other chapters. N-N-N Where, Oh Where have all the re- porters been hiding? Don't be the last chapter in your state to get into print. Whether it's news, notes, or nonsense, send it. The National FUTURE FARMER FFA in Action Training "Wheels" There was a full battery of high level speakers and FFA officials on hand for the first Regional State Officer Lead- ership Conference for 1973. Officers from Virginia, Pennsylvan- ia, West Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, and New Jersey were participants or trainees for the weekend session in Alexandria, Virginia. The national of- ficer team served as a training task force for the event. Keynote speaker for the Friday even- ing session of the conference at the FFA Center was freshman congress- man from Missouri, Jerry Litton. He "fired up" the officers with his remarks on "Leadership for the Future." Mr. Litton is a past national FFA secretary and a well-known cattle breeder. Saturday's work session began with remarks by Assistant to the Secretary of Agriculture Herb Plambeck. Offi- cers worked on all phases of communi- cations including public speaking, tele- phone usage, good letters, thank you notes, introductions, and ceremonies. National FFA Advisor H. N. Hun- sicker extended "The Challenge of Leadership" to the conference on Sun- day morning. Dates and locations of the remaining Regional State Officer Leadership Con- ferences are listed in the "Calendar of Events" on page 40. Congressman Litton and Vice President Tim hail from Chillicothe, Missouri. Learn and Earn Members of the Bushnell-Prairie City, Illinois, FFA formed a cooperative themselves after studying about coop- eratives in class and listening to a local co-op manager. Steven Hess, chapter vice president, was elected manager of the cooperative with Jay Melvin as sec- retary-treasurer. A limited number of shares were printed and sold at a rate set by the April-May 1973 elected board of directors. All class members were given a chance to buy or sell their shares during the exercise. With the capital secured by selling shares the members purchased mater- ials to build two hog shades. All mem- bers participated in the construction, and the finished product, with the co- operation of the local lumber yard, was put on the market. When both sheds were sold, the mem- bers owning shares received dividends on their original investment. Share own- ers learned and earned much with their cooperative project. The members also plan to tour area cooperatives. (Mike Sharon, Reporter) Down Under Swan Hill Guardian Photo Stephen Hunt, Kentucky, center, and Mike McClure and Lyall Thiessen, both of Kansas, visited Future Farmers in Swan Hill, Australia, on the way from a Work Experience in New Zealand. Suffers First Loss The National FFA Officer team lost their first basketball game to the Tri- Valley, New York, FFA Chapter. The game could have been won by the na- tional officers if the last jump shot had been made at the final buzzer. The national officer team had a bal- anced attack with President Dwight Seegmiller; Vice Presidents Zane Han- sen and Bruce Erath; and Associate Executive Secretary Coleman (jump- shot) Harris, player-coach, as leading scorers. Secretary Jerry Goolsby and Vice President Robert Hinton played a tight defensive game to contribute to the team score. Vice President Tim Daugherty was on assignment at Cor- nell University. The Tri-Valley FFA team's scoring was lead by Sam Bertholf, with 18 points. He was helped in the scoring by / ^ . . - . i^i The national officer basketball team was outfitted in official T-shirts for the big match against Tri-Valley. Butch Stratton, Jim Gorman, and Gar- ry Eltz. State President Allen Bitter and Walter Garigliano while not scor- ing played a good defensive game. The school pep band kept the tempo of the game going and was an important part of the evening's activities. After the game the chapter members and par- ents had a chance to meet and talk with the national officers while enjoy- ing some refreshments in the cafeteria. (Richard Slrangeway, Advisor) Peanut Togetherness A mutual interest in peanuts has brought together two local FFA chap- ters and two rural communities, geo- graphically separated by a span of 1,350 miles, and fused them in warmest friendship. This is the Hartford, Ala- bama-Litchfield, Minnesota, story! (See "Dairy or Peanut Butter" in December- January 72-73 issue. ) It all began one-year-ago when Mr. Bruce Cottington and Advisor Ken Stark issued an invitation for an Ala- bama FFA'er to participate in the first International Peanut Butter and Dairy Festival in Meeker County, Minne- sota. Mr. Cottington is a big promoter of dairy products and peanut butter, and Mr. Stark is an agriculture teacher. (Continued on Next Page) Brent Schultz and fellow Mlnnesotans toured an Alabama peanut processing plant while touring "peanut country." SOUTHEASTERN COLLEGE DURANT, OK 7470X „,„,„ „„^ ,_^ , Please send /■S£U I me the 1973 catalog for your sScS I ful^y accredited small college near Lake | Texoma with out-of-state bd., rm. & tuition j averaging only 40. I am particularly in- j terested m Q AVIATION (BS degree program) ! D CONSERVATION, Q TEACHING, D SOCIAL SCIENCES, D OTHER (name) [ NAME- FREE FACTS on Home-Study Course n GAME WARDEN GOV'T HUNTER, FORESTRYAID.WILDLIFE MANAGER Exciting job openings now for qualified men who y love outdoor work. Profecf foresfs t^nd wildlife— ^ arrest violalors! Good pay, security, prestige and 'authority for respected career Conservation '" Officers. Easy home-sludy plan' Send for FREE -CONSERVATION CAREER KIT.-Sfote your age. > APPROVED FOR VETERANS .\ ' NORTH AMERICAN SCHOOL OF CONSERVATION ^ ' 4500 Campus Or., Oepl. 31984, Newport Beacti, Calif. 92GG3 SPY RADIO AMAZING TINY RADIO hidden in pen. Listen in secret to your fa- -ite sport, news or music show! Use ilmost anywhere — bed. school, in or if-doors. Tiny eaiphone included for ate listenine. AmazinR circuit is self- powered. Plays forever at no cost. No bat- teries. Ready to use. Use 30 days, money back if not pleased. IF BROKEN WITHIN 2 YEARS WE WILL REPLACE AT NO CHARGE. Order today! Only .25 add 35 postage, han- dling. Grandpa's Shop. Dept. RA-2736, 9043 g. Western Ave., Chicago. 111. Mail Orders only. YOU NEED THIS Train your own horse. Teach him to stand untied, gait, trailer load, barrel race and do tricks. Our course in horsemanship has a thousand pages of great ideas. Information about how you can purchase the course will be sent to all who inquire. IT'S A BARGAIN. AMERICAN HORSEMANSHIP, INC. Department B Nebo, Illinois 62355 In December it will be too late! In December of 1973, it will be too late to consider using Official FFA Calendars to promote your chapter and vo-ag department in 1974. So include it now in your planning session for next year. This official program can gain publicity and attention for your chapter in the community. And it can be done at no cost to the chapter (with business firm sponsors). In fact, your FFA chapter can earn a sales commission. Other chapters might choose to purchase the calendars as a Thank You for the support of your community. What are the details? Send for your chap- ter's FREE 1974 Official FFA Calendar Kit with samples of the four styles and order forms. Don't wait until December. It will be too late. Do it this spring. Calendar Dept. The National FUTURE FARMER P.O. Box 15T30 Alexandria, Virginia 22309 38 FFA in Action (Continued from Page 37) In making their "invite" for Ala- bamians to make the trip to Minne- sota, all expenses paid, the Minnesotans made one prime specification. The member had to be a peanut farmer. Excited by the offer, Neil Outlaw, Hartford FFA member, his mother and father, and FFA Advisor and Mrs. P. C. Dean went north. At the gala banquet held in conjunc- tion with the agriculture festival, Neil was presented a 0 scholarship and the Alabamians were treated royally. So cordial was their reception in Litchfield, the Hartford people made immediate plans to reciprocate. Enlist- ing the whole Hartford community — town council, civic clubs, school per- sonnel, and everybody — the Outlaws and Deans played return host last month to Brent Schultz, a Litchfield FFA member, "Peanuts" Cottington, and Mr. and Mrs. Stark for a four-day goodwill tour of southeast Alabama. While in Alabama the Minnesota del- egation visited Governor Wallace. They toured a peanut butter manufacturing plant, took in Dothan's National Peanut Festival, and got firsthand exposure to peanut production. It was probably FFA'er Schultz's first time to see pea- nuts harvested. When asked why he chose the FFA instead of other vehicles or youth groups to work with, Mr. Cottington Iseamed, "I believe in it. The FFA is superior to all organizations in ren- dering rural development." When asked why he was sold on peanuts, he said, "I happen to like peanut butter!" (Cecil Gant) Traveling Zoo The FFA chapter at Colleton, South Carolina, came up with a unique pro- ject — a traveling zoo. The FFA members collected various farm animals and exhibited them to all The Colleton, South Carolina, FFA'ers enjoyed showing animals to the kids. elementary and junior high schools in the county. FFA Advisor J. B. Middle- ton states, "We got the idea from Mr. W. R. Carter, district consultant for vocational agricultural education, and members were enthusiastic about it." The chapter members borrowed a cotton trailer and renovated it to han- dle animals borrowed from vocatiortal agriculture students. The animals displayed included a deer, a sow and pigs, a turkey, a pair of rab- bits, a goat, ducks, a chicken and a calf. "I think the children really enjoyed the exhibit. Even the youngsters who live on farms weren't familiar with all the animals. Of course, everybody's favorite was the deer, who was very tame," according to Advisor Middleton. Fifty Banquets "There's only one thing standing in the way of a successful marriage — him!" The Modesto, California, FFA re- cently celebrated its 50th annual parent- member banquet. This special event was held at Central High's auditorium where almost 400 members and guests attend- ed to reminisce old times. Nearly 100 past State Farmers were among those honored. Past and pre- sent members were able to talk over past experiences and achievements. Be- fore the program, the guests were able to view various trophies, banners, awards, old scrapbooks and chapter newspapers, yearbooks, and other in- teresting awards that the Modesto FFA has achieved over the past half-century. There is an explanation as to why they celebrated their 50th banquet. At Modesto High an ag class was started in 1916. Then an Ag Club was started in 1918. After things started rolling the club gave an ag banquet in the school year of 1922-23 and invited the mem- bers and their parents. Finally in 1930 the FFA chapter was officially char- tered and banquets simply continued. After an excellent catered meal, the tables were cleared and President Gor- don Heinrich gave the evening welcome, followed by freshman Randy Heinrich who recited the FFA Creed. Awards during the evening included the Scholastic Achievement award giv- The National FUTURE FARMER en to: senior, Mark Bruhaker; junior, John Boyd; sophomore, Benton Hart; and freshman, David Zeliman. Highlights of the chapter's past year's activities were presented by John Boyd, including accomplishments up to the present banquet. Past Advisor Donald Heintz, presented Golden State Farmer degrees to seven FFA members. The chapter was then presented the National Chapter award which it has received continually since 1949. Three chapter members then received the highest national award possible, the Am- erican Farmer degree. This year the chapter gave two Hon- orary Chapter degrees. One to past Ad- visor Heintz, and one to current in- structor. Advisor Russel Cosgrave. To top off a highly successful even- ing, Modesto High's principal, Mr. Eu- gene Mould gave his slide presentation called "America the Beautiful" showing scenic pictures he has taken of the United States. (John Boyd, Reporter) Inauguration Crowd National officers braved cold winds in Washington for the presidential inauguration on the Capitol grounds. Picnic Tables on Sale . ^ Give A Day to FFA The FFA Alumni's major thrust to gain membership called "Operation Teamwork" is being continued into the summer. You are an important part of this effort to unite support for the FFA by building FFA Alumni membership in every community all across America. If you sign up ten or more Alumni members you can charter an FFA Alumni chapter in your community. Most FFA members will find at least one former or honorary member right in their own family. Every Alumni member you sign will receive a Special Membership Card. If you help form an affiliate, your chapter will receive a Charter Certificate and a handsome Roll of Charter Members Scroll. Everyone who signs up ten or more Alumni members will receive the "Le- gion of Merit" citation and will be hon- ored at the National FFA Convention. Dues are .00 for annual member- ship, 0 for life membership. Send applications or requests for more in- formation to: FFA Alumni Association, Box 15058, Alexandria, Virginia 22309. Construction of picnic tables can be a fund raiser plus community service. Building picnic tables and benches out of concrete is the primary money making project of Foley, Alabama, FFA. The chapter began the project two years ago. Originally the second hand cement forms cost the vocational agriculture department 5. Construction materi- als for one table costs about .00. Be- cause of time required for the setting of the cement, it takes several members about four hours to form six bench legs but less time to make two bench seats and one table. "The demand for the tables continues real strong and people ask when they will be ready right after school opens in the fall," says Advisor Bobby Hanks. This year the chapter hopes to sell about 25 table and bench sets for around .00 each. Most of the tables sold are used on lawns and patios, and many faculty members are among the buyers. In addition, between 25 and 30 tables have been placed on campus for eating lunch and school activities. The students "really make use of them" and some tables are even painted blue and gold — which are also the school's colors. Profits from the project are used to finance the annual chapter banquet. This year Foley members also plan to replace tools in the shop and hold a spring barbecue with the proceeds. Team Triumph Winner of the FFA livestock judging contest at the Denver National Western Stock Show was the Kansas team re- presented by Kiowa. The contest consists of judging eight classes of livestock including three spe- cies of cattle, sheep, and swine. Bret Spicer received the high indivi- dual trophy in the swine judging while Fred Gillig received the trophy for be- ing the high individual in judging sheep. Fred also won a second trophy for scoring the most points of any FFA member at the contest. Other placings by members of the Kansas team were: Kent Harbaugh, fourth in beef; Fred Gillig, second in (Continued on Next Page) hunting hints Always sneak up on a pothole from the upwind side, that is, with the wind at your back. Ducks invariably flush into the wind, so they will start your way as they get up off of the water. Even if they flare off immediately, you will gain a few precious sec- onds in which to get off a shot or two. SPECIAL OFFER. A 32-page book on "Upland Game Birds" and a 24-page book on "Big Game Animals". Loaded with facts and full color photographs. Send 500 for each, plus your name and address to: Federal •Book Offer, Box 625, Maple Plain, Minnesota 55359. For everything from plinking to big game hunting, clay targets to wild turkeys, Federal concen- trates on producing the finest ammunition available to sports- men. April-May 1973 AMMO IS OUR ONLY BUSINESS FEDERAL CARTRIDGE CORPORATION MINNEAPOLIS. MINNESOTA 55402 39 Be aVETERINARY ASSISTANT Lab Aide, Zoo Keeper, Pet Shop/ Stable Owni I MEN -WOMEN! Train at Home in Spare Time , . I Send tor Career K» — ALL FREE.' i ponies — make good money do- it. Write, todav for this instruc- e FREE booklw't plus a special of- of a course in Animal BreedinK. Tell us ■ou are interested in Gaiting and Riding saddle horse. BEERY SCHOOL OF HORSEMANSHIP 2024 Pleasant Hill. Ohio 4S3S9 CALVES-CALVES-CALVES— 2 to 14 weeks old. All calves delivered on approval with a Veterinary health certificate. Must meet with your approval on arrival only. Min- imum order 25 head. We deliver or you may pick your own. Call or write BILL NOLAN LIVESTOCK, Inc., Bonduel, Wis. 54107. Phone 715-758-8484 SCHOOL LICENSE PLATES Sell at 100% to 300% Profit Write for FREE catalog and sample of our work QUALITY PRODUCTS, INC. LltsZ 39701 Change of Address If you are moving, please let us know promptly so you will continue to receive your magazine without interruption. Fill in your new address below and mail it with the address label (Attach below.) from the last issue of your magazine. To Subscribe Keep The National FUTURE FARMER com- ing—even after you are out of high school. Fill in your name and address be- low and mail this form with your pay- ment. Enclose .00 for each year you wish to subscribe. If you are renewing your subscription, attach address label from your last magazine. Attach address label from your last magazine tiere! This is a (check below) Subscription order Change of address Mall To: The National FUTURE FARMER P.O. Box 15130 Alexandria, Virginia 22309 Name Route Box No.. City State 40 -Zip Code- FFA in Action Foot Work (Continued from Page 39) IF C ..^ beef; Kent Harbaugh, sixth overall; Bret Spicer, third overall. Official placings of the first five ^ teams were: Kansas, Wyoming, Colo- J^ rado, Oklahoma, and Nebraska. ''^^ Speaking English FFA has helped Jesse Armen+eros learn the language and discover agriculture. The main goal of Jesse Armenteros of Panama when he came to the United States four years ago was to learn En- glish. "I feel I have accomplished this goal by winning the state FFA public speaking contest," remarks Jesse, a member at Winter, California. The Winters FFA'er also participated in parliamentary procedure as chairman of the sectional winning team and on livestock judging teams. He previously served as chapter treasurer and is the current president of the Winters FFA. Jesse's other high school activities in- clude membership in the photography club and work on the Winters Express as a printer's apprentice. Throughout vocational agriculture Jesse, who lives with an uncle on a small farm, maintained a farming pro- gram of cattle, layers, and fryers. Jesse says, "After I finish high school I would like to go back to Panama to see my folks." Following his trip to Panama Jesse hopes to study agriculture at Cal- ifornia Polytechnic Institute. Prize Porker Cloister, Pennsylvania, FFA'ers Marlin Smoker, left, and Richard Bollinger, raised 16 pigs in partnership. One of the Hamp-York crosses was named grand champion at the Lancaster County FFA show and was sold tor .12 per pound. Horseshoeing demonstrations in the FFA Barnyard at the Minnesota State Fair were popular attractions. State officers and Princess Kay watched, too. I Calendar of Events | April 12-26— State Presidents' European Study Seminar June 4-7— Work Experience Abroad Orien- tation Conference October 17-19— National FFA Convention, Kansas City, Missouri National FFA Conferences Washington, D. C— Alexandria, Virginia June 18-23, June 25-30, July 9-14, July 16- 21 — Chapter Representatives July 23-28— State Presidents Regional State Officer Conferences June 18-19 — Cody, Wyoming June 26-28 — Kansas City, Missouri June 27-29— Clifty Falls, Indiana June 20-22 — Treasure Valley, Oregon July 10-14 — Mobile, Alabama July 16-18— Stillwater, Oklahoma August 1-3 — Covington, Georgia August 6-8 — Bristol, Massachusetts State FFA Conventions May 1-6 — California May 3-5— New York May 6 — New Hampshire May 6-9— Minnesota May 6-11— Puerto Rico May 17-19— Vermont May 28-30— Kansas May 28-30— Mississippi May 28-June 1 — Arkansas June 3-5 — Colorado June 3-5 — New Mexico June 3-8 — South Carolina June 4-8 — North Dakota June 4-9 — Alabama June 6-8 — Kentucky June 6-8 — Louisiana June 6-8 — North Carolina June 9-14 — Washington June 10-13 — Wisconsin June 10-15— Florida June 11-15 — Illinois June 17-21 — Indiana June 17-21 — Virginia June 24-25 — Connecticut June 25-26 — New Jersey June 25-27— Maryland June 26-27— Maine Jtme 28-29 — Pennsylvania State conventions held later will appear in future issues. The National FUTURE FARMER Western shirts available from Dickson-Jen- kins Manufacturing, El Paso, Texas, feature back yokes with I to 3 points and short or long sleeves in solids, stripes, and patterns. A Garb Shop Among Panhandle Slim's double-knit fashions are this Aztec Print suit for women and Trader Plaid sport coat for men. Both come in black and other col- ors accented on white from Westmoor Manufacturing, Omaha, Nebraska. The Worker Blunt, Style 234, features tapered con- struction, oil-tanned leath- er, and a chemigum sole. The boot is styled by No- cona Boot, Nocona, Texas. Bailey Hat, Los Angeles, Cal- ifornia, has introduced a tall, gold-colored, straw called the Sun-up. It comes in bull rider, open crown, and cutter shapes. The Golden Spike, made by Justin Boot, Fort Worth, Tex- as features a lizard vamp, a 1 2- inch top, and five-row stitch- ing. The boot is Style 9031. An SOpage booklet that covers all as- pects of beef man- agement including selection, breeding, feeding, and show- ing Hereford cattle. For your FREE copy write; The American HEREFORD Association 715 HBrefonl Dr. Kansas City, Mo. 64105 SUFFOIKS— THE SUCCESSFUL ONES Suffolk lambs are hardy, gain reach market earlier. Unexcelled muHon carcasses. Write cpidly. NATIONAL SUFFOLK SHEEP ASSOCIATION BOX 324 F, COLUMBIA, MO. 65201 CHEVIOTS hove what it takes: • To survive lambing hazards; • To develop desirable corcass weights on milk and grass alone; • To impart these qualities to less fortunate breeds through crossing Write today for interesting free booklet. American Cheviot Sheep Society Box 18, Lafayette Hill, Pa. 19444 ^^ HAMPSHIRES... ^^BMf 1^ For Uniformity, Docility, ^^v Quality and a money mak- ^T '19 breed use Hompshires. Write for information. The American Hampshire Sheep Assn. Stuart. Iowa 50250 Telephone: (515)523-1486 One of A Kind There is only one official supplier of FFA merchandise. It is National FFA Supply Service, Alexandria, Virginia. • Owned by FFA • Operated by FFA • For FFA That's right. Totally owned by FFA mem- bers and operated for them. Controlled by the National FFA Board of Directors and National FFA Officers. All income above the cost of operation Is used by the organization for the benefit of FFA members — not as profit to any individual. Don't be mislead by companies trying to commercialize on the name and emblem of FFA. If it is not from the National FFA Supply Service located at Alexandria, Vir- ginia, it is not official. Your advisor is mailed a catalog each summer. See him to order your FFA items. Support FFA! Order from the: National FFA Supply Service P. O Box 15159 Alexandria. Virginia 22309 April-May 1973 Smith: "I'm really worried about my brother. He drives like lightning." Tim: "You mean he drives too fast?" Smith: "No, he strikes trees." Larry Block Wauhay, South Dakota "Here's one bill we won't have to worry about anymore . . . it's marked 'Final Notice.' " Once two hunters got lost in the for- est. The first hunter said, "Now we must be calm." The second hunter agreed, "You're right. I read that if lost you should shoot three times into the air and someone will come and rescue you." So they did this, and nothing happened. They did it again, and still no help came. They repeated this several times without re- sults. Finally the first hunter said, "What are we going to do now?" The second hunter replied, "/ don't know. We're almost out of arrows." Debbie Peters York, Nebraska Mother: "/ don't think the neighbors appreciate Johnny's music." Father: "What happened?" Mother: "They gave him a penknife and asked him if he knew what the in- side of his drum looked like." Dwayne Boster Crown City, Ohio FFA JOKE BOOK A collection of the escapades and antics of one of FFA's funniest members, "Charlie, the Greenhand." Plus other jokes that have appeared inTheWatioTialFUTURE FARMER. For your copy, send 50 cents with your name and address to: Joke Book. The Na- tional FUTURE FARMER, P. O. Box 15130, Alexandria, Virginia 22309. Ed: "That new man I hired yesterday doesn't know much about farming." Fred: "How's that?" Ed: "He found some milk bottles behind the barn and then came up to me and said he found a cow's nest." Robert West Pierce City, Missouri Patient: "Every time I drink a cup of coffee I get a sharp pain in my eye. What should I do?" Doctor: "Take the spoon out." Lori Emerson Tooele, Utah Burlington: "Do you know it takes five sheep to make one wool sweater?" Kodel: "Really? I didn't even know they could knit." Jim Renz Jefferson, WiscoTisin Alex: "What happened to the man who bought snow tires?" Alfred: "They melted." Alfred Fryar Clinton, North Carolina A 100-year-old man went to blow out the candles on his birthday cake and his dentures melted. Steve MiUer Charles City, Iowa Big Brother: "Know how I keep my head above water?" Little Brother: "Sure, wood floats." Douglas Smith Martin, Georgia Angry Teenager: "This car won't go up hills. You said it was a fine machine." Dealer: "/ said, 'On the level it's- a fine car.' " David Cissell Hickory, Kentucky Sam: "Excuse me, I think you're sit- ting in my seat." Bully: "Can you prove it?" Sam: "// my cream pie is there." Kim Meyer Blaisdell, North Dakota Teacher: "Why do I always find you here by the drinking fountain?" Student: "Because you wear soft- soled shoes." Brenda Van Meeteren Luveme, Minnesota Pain is in the hand of the beeholder. Frank Coughenour Lakeland, Florida Mother Lightning Bug to Father Lightning Bug: "Isn't Junior bright for his age?" Calvin Wilson Autaugaville, Alabama Eye doctor: "Have your eyes ever been checked?" Patient: "No, always blue." David Cross Clarkrange, Tennessee Sign in store window: Don't laugh at our coffee. You, too, may be old and weak some day. Charles Senig Lancaster, Ohio Charlie, the Greenhand 7^aaA7-V One chicken platter, a coke, and a few minutes to speak to you about a career in the poultry industry." 42 The National Fdtuhe Farmeb wUl pay SI. 00 for each joke selected for publication on this page. Jokes must be submitted on post cards addressed to the National Future Farmer, Alexandria, Virginia 22309. In case of duplication, payment wiU be made for the first one received. Contributions cannot be acknowledged or returned. the difference.,. is in styling. In addition to over 60 in-stock boots, Tony Lama craftsmen can make up any style you choose. is having a choice in top styles flat, shallow or full scallop on any height top. is in the quality of fancy stitchinj in over 300 styles. is a variety of over 250 leathers and color combinations. "'---^ is having the choice of the heel you like — over 10 heights and shapes to choose from. \. is a genuine hand-rolled shank for maximum arch support and comfort. is a selection of 20 different types of toes to fit your needs. \ is the pride and care that is put into each pair of boots. yon^Jama TONY LAMA COMPANY, INC. / 1137 TONY LAMA STREET / EL PASO, TEXAS 79915 GiaJnpower facts about New Holland combines. Grainpower is what a farmer wants most in a combine. Facts are what he wants most about any machine before he buys. Here, Sperry New Holland offers the kind of information that helps a man make a wise choice. (And, of course, we hope he chooses us.) What you see. The New Holland Model 995 is an impressive giant, that's for sure. But what meets the eye should not necessarily be the deciding factor. The most important components are inside. What you don't see. Of course, nobody can ob- serve the internal "balance" quite the way this illus- tration shows. But it's there, as this representation shows. And you know it just as soon as you see it work —the tank fills up fast and you don't get a lot of grain scattering out the back. probably take for granted nowadays. Easy to service. This is probably not the most im- portant thing on a person's mind when buying a new combine. So we want to be sure we direct attention to it — and show how we've provided access doors and panels that put all major serv- ce areas within easy reach. A little thing, perhaps, but very important. Bad news for birds. The better a combine works, the worse for our feathered friends. (They'll simply have to fill up in somebody else's fields!) Sperry New Hol- land combines perform so well '^^^ " because they're the result of 67 years of grain-harvesting experience. It has placed us in the top four in the world in the sale of big, self- propelled combines. It has also earned us a reputation as an aggressive, innovative company, one that's never quite satisfied with the way things are. And farmers reap the benefit of this creative restlessness. So think of this when you think about machinery: Just as important as the equipment you buy is the com- pany behind it. The Inside story: Balance '^ Never leave your seat. Not be- cause you want to be lazy, but be- cause you want to be efficient. We simply want to remind you that the more you stay seated, the more ground you'll cover. And we've thoughtfully arranged all the main controls so that they're right close to the driver. Sperry New Holland was first, by the way, to make standard the complete package of on-the-go controls that you SFERRY^^^EW HOLLAfND Sperry New Holland is a Division of Sperry Rand Corporation


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Full text of Clemson Newsletter - Internet Archive


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